To purchase photos visit http://photos.newtownbee.com×

Destination Newtown Keynote Aims To Help Professionals Get Productive

Published: September 24, 2016

This year’s keynote at Destination Newtown advises anyone who wishes there were a few extra hours in the day to make the time to stop in and hear his presentation.

“Of course I can’t add hours to the clock, but a lot of people find that once they learn the process of staying organized and managing their valuable time, they have a lot more of it,” Dr Donald Wetmore told The Bee during a recent phone interview.

Destination Newtown with its trade show and “Taste of Newtown” sampling of restaurant fare is slated for Wednesday, September 28, from 4 to 7 pm, at Edmond Town Hall, 45 Main Street. That main event is preceded by a Business Networking Reception from 2:30 to 4 pm, which will include Dr Wetmore’s talk. There is a $10 entry charge for current Newtown Chamber members and a $15 charge for nonmembers.

For the main Destination Newtown event, admission is free, and welcomes the entire family with not only a wide participation from local businesses, but a family corner, tours of the town hall, live music, trivia, games, raffles, prizes, and a brand-new “What Newtown Means to You” canvas art project.

In 1982, Dr Wetmore created the Productivity Institute to conduct his original three-day “Time Management and Personal Productivity” seminar for participants around the world. Having been in the field for more than 30 years, Dr Wetmore created this program to address the specific personal productivity and time management needs of anyone wanting to do more in their day.

In the program, he teaches participants how to double their personal productivity both on and off the job and do it in less time, thereby helping participants to get more done in less time and create more balance in their personal lives. Dr Wetmore said that he will be concentrating most of his remarks to issues and practices specific to business people and professionals, although much of the information is useful to anyone.

“The principles I’ll share are universally applied by millions of business people, employees, and even those who are looking for work,” he said. “The big complaint from everybody is they never have enough time.”

Dr Wetmore said workforce audiences find it difficult to recognize that statistically, about half their “work time” is not spent on work.

“There’s a lot of reasons why that we’ll key in on during the event. But mostly its the many interruptions these people endure, being called to meetings they have no business being in, and of course social media and the internet,” he said. “The idea of personal productivity is not a goal of being productive 100 percent of the time — nobody achieves that.”

The other issue, he believes, may be tied to motivation — which can drive a passionate person to work harder and smarter.

“The US Department of Labor recently posted that 80 percent of people going to work this morning don’t want to be there,” Dr Wetmore observed. “So if folks don’t want to be there, their focus and attention isn’t on productivity. They’re more inclined to find distractions. So the program I’ll share will give them tools and techniques they can use to literally make extra time in their day.”

During the past 20 years, Dr Wetmore has made more than 2,000 public speaking presentations to thousands of people from around the globe covering the principles he has created. And he is one of a handful of professional speakers worldwide specializing full-time and exclusively in the topics he will be addressing in Newtown September 28.

Widely regarded as one of the leading experts in the field, he has been featured nationally in numerous high-profile news articles, on countless radio, television programs, and his informative time management articles and tips appear regularly in hundreds of newsletters worldwide and on the internet.

He said that business owners need to be aware of individuals who are unmotivated, because both anecdotally and statistically, they tend to steal productive time away from other, more dedicated workers.

Combine that with the time workers tend to spend tethered to their smartphones and it adds up to countless hours of productivity lost.

“I saw an article that reviewed five myths about smartphones, and while you might think they help productivity, people spend so much time with them it actually wipes out any advances they may have made in their productivity they are trying to get from all those apps,” he said. “I suppose eventually we’ll get a handle on that. But there’s no question about it, people are more distracted by them.”

So how much of what Dr Wetmore teaches to workers and professionals can be applied at work and at home?

“Most of the people who take our seminars or go to our sessions in their workplace come back and say they got as much or more out of the organizational skills they learned about for their home life, as their work life,” he said.

Dr Wetmore and his wife Nancy reside in Trumbull, and recently celebrated their 31st wedding anniversary. They are the parents of four children, each of whom is an excellent time manager, Dr Wetmore added.

 

Related Articles