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  • Police Reports | February 19-March 3, 2014

  • Fire Reports | February 27-March 4, 2014

  • Workshop Slated To Create Action Plan For Sandy Hook

    Newtown residents and visitors to Sandy Hook have undoubtedly noticed recent improvements in the village center. Phase II of the new streetscape, with sidewalks, pedestrian-oriented lighting and amenities, was recently completed, enhancing the visual impression and creating a more enjoyable and walkable environment. Events and activities, such as Passport to Sandy Hook, The Great Pootatuck Duck Race, and the Sandy Hook Tree Lighting have been successful in bringing people to the village to celebrate and enjoy each other’s company. A new branding and marketing program has been developed for Sandy Hook Village, and the community is gearing up to launch new promotional material that will benefit small businesses with the impending hire of a brand steward. Now, the village is working on the nuts and bolts of creating a strategic action plan, and the public is invited to participate. A Sandy Hook Action Planning Workshop will be held on Wednesday, March 12, at Sandy Hook Fire & Rescue Company's main station. Hosted by Sandy Hook Organization for Prosperity, the community is invited to attend and help craft the plan.

  • Team 26 Departure To DC Is March 8; Kick-Off Rally Moved To Edmond Town Hall

    Gun violence touches all ethnicities and socioeconomic group. The push for more sensible gun safety legislation has helped to unify communities that would appear to have little in common. On Saturday, March 8, at 8 am, a group of cyclists known as Team 26 will embark on a 400-mile journey — the 2nd Annual Sandy Hook Ride On Washington (SHROW) — departing from Edmond Town Hall to show how diverse communities across the nation have one common goal: make streets safer and put an end to the gun-violence epidemic. Originally scheduled to take place at Reed Intermediate School, the kick-off rally has been moved to the front steps and courtyard at 45 Main Street. The four-day “rolling rally” will include events in Ridgefield and Greenwich, Harlem, N.Y., Doylestown, Penn., Baltimore and College Park, Md., and Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., before ending at the steps of the US Capitol Building.

  • Independently Owned Newtown RadioShack Staying Open

    Responding to a call from The Newtown Bee, the operators of Newtown’s independently owned RadioShack store said on March 4 they will remain open even as its corporate owners are announcing the closure of about 1,100 other company-owned stores across the country. RadioShack Corporation announced on Tuesday that it plans to close about a fifth of its US locations. The news came as the retailer reported a wider quarterly loss after a disappointing holiday season. Long known as a destination for batteries and obscure electronic parts, RadioShack has sought to remake itself as a specialist in wireless devices and accessories. But growth in the wireless business is slowing, as more people have smartphones and see fewer reasons to upgrade. In addition to slashing costs and shuffling management, RadioShack has been renovating its stores with a more modern look. The company said that the stores targeted for closings are being selected based on location, area demographics, lease duration, and financial performance.

  • Llodra Wants To See Armed School Guards In Municipal Budget

    First Selectman Pat Llodra told the Board of Finance during a budget meeting February 27 that she is planning to budget a contingent of nine armed, retired police officers who will serve as armed school security officers (SSOs) in local schools beginning this September. Under the suggested plan, the school district will continue to employ a security director, and eight unarmed guards who will be distributed throughout the local network of facilities. The first selectman said that the long-term plan was to devise a model for the entire community for safe schools, and that it will be a shared commitment and structure between the town and district. The town will continue utilizing two additional local police officers who are trained as school resource officers (SROs) and one additional youth officer.

  • Sandy Ground Playground Build Updated, 5K Fundraiser Planned

    The Sandy Ground Project was established by the New Jersey Fireman’s Benevolent Association last year. Its mission is to build 26 playgrounds along the coast of New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut in towns hit by Hurricane Sandy. Each playground honors and honors and provides a lasting memory of the 26 children and teachers who lost their lives at Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14, 2012. Milford will be home of one of those playgrounds. To be located at 150 Gulf Street, it will be built this month in memory of 6-year-old James Mattioli. Volunteers are sought to help build the playground, and runners are sought for a 5K fundraiser planned for the morning of the playground's ribbon cutting.

  • New Area Code Coming To Connecticut This Year

    The state’s Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) announced on Monday that a new area code will be introduced later this year in Connecticut, in the calling region currently served by the 860 area code. Because of continuing local demand for telephone numbers, remaining unassigned telephone numbers in the 860 area code are expected to be exhausted by the end of 2014. PURA approved a new area code, 959, to be assigned as an overlay to the 860 region to meet the demand. For most customers, the new area code should have minimal impact.

  • Ambulance Garage Construction Continues

    Beneath snowy skies that finally gave way to sunshine Wednesday, crews with Nosal Builders Inc worked a crane, lifting roof trusses onto the new ambulance garage. Walking across rough, frozen ground at the new construction’s location at Fairfield Hil...

  • State Official: Charity After Shootings Chaotic

    (AP) Millions of dollars in unsolicited contributions suddenly poured in to Connecticut from around the nation and the world following the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, a phenomenon that differed from natural disasters, where donors know to send money to established charities, the state’s consumer protection commissioner said on Friday. William Rubenstein described to Gov Dannel P. Malloy’s Sandy Hook Advisory Commission during its most recent meeting how cash, checks and in-kind gifts were sent to Newtown Municipal Center, churches, local banks, the United Way and other charitable funds. In some cases, the donors spelled out how they wanted the money to be spent. Other donations came with little to no guidance. Despite the confusion and no recognizable structure that could accept donations, Mr Rubenstein said, there was minimal outright fraud.