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  • Theater Review: Martin’s ‘Underpants’ Enjoyable As Long Wharf Opener

    A century ago a German playwright named Carl Sternheim wrote a ribald comedy satirizing the manners and aspirations of the rising bourgeoisie. Ninety years later, the actor, comedian and serious writer Steve Martin, took Sternheim’s play — Die Hose — and adapted it into an equally raunchy farce, The Underpants, which is serving currently the season opener for Long Wharf’s C. Newton Schenck III Theatre. As directed by Gordon Edelstein, "The Underpants" is a frothy and enjoyable piece of theater, if not a memorable one. It has good permances, a great set, and delightful period costumes including a variety of bloomers that would put Victoria’s Secret to shame.

  • Where Is The Chow?

    Time is running out to make donations to Adopt-A-Shelter Dog Month and when Piper last checked out the drop-off box at The Newtown Bee, it was a long way down to the several cans of food at the bottom. Items for the Newtown Animal Control Center are being received until November 1, any time the office at 5 Church Hill Road is open.

  • A WIN-Win For FAITH Food Pantry

    FAITH Food Pantry has relied on the kindness and support of Newtown residents and even a few businesses for more than three decades. The pantry, situated in the undercroft of St John’s Episcopal Church on Washington Avenue, earlier this year observed its 30th anniversary of of providing food to residents who need a hand putting meals on their table. In June, food pantry co-organizers report they were providing food for nearly 5,000 meals per week. Volunteers plan for three meals per day per family member. Earlier this month, Women Involved in Newtown became the latest local group to offer an ongoing donation to the food pantry, which also provides toiletry items for many of its clients. WIN has arranged to have a small basket placed inside the Newtown Starbucks store, and it was quietly put into place a few weeks ago.

  • Snapshot: Dr Rob Bazuro

    A weekly profile of a local person.

  • The Top of the Mountain

    Newtown, from a cat's point of view.

  • The Way We Were

    A look back at Newtown 25, 50, 75, and 100 years ago.

  • Trick Or Treat…Or Pizza At Dickinson Park

    Witches were more concerned about candy than casting spells, and super heroes, monsters, butterflies and bumble bees shared tables to eat pizza Thursday, October 24, as dusk fell over Dickinson Park. Again this year the Parks and Recreation Department offered hayrides and threw a Halloween party for young children. Dressed as the Cookie Monster, Jake Ragan and his sister Riley, a corduroy bear, played games set up under the pavilion. Connor Child wore a cowboy hat, long duster, and red bandana to complete his outfit. Ava Carlson took her inspiration from Broadway and dressed in a red dress and vibrant red wig as orphan Annie. Around her were several butterflies and quite a few firemen and young Supermans.

  • Get Carving: Great Pumpkin Challenge Collection Is This Weekend

    Collection times have been set for this Saturday, October 26, and Sunday, October 27, for the Great Pumpkin Challenge. This is the third year Newtown High School sophomore Mackenzie Page has challenged residents to carve a pumpkin, drop it off for display at her home at 14 Main Street, and offer a suggested donation of $5. Drop-off hours are between 10 am and 5 pm both days...

  • Theater Review: ‘Room Service’ An Enjoyable Season Finalé At Westport Country Playhouse

    For its final production of the season Westport Country Playhouse has chosen a 1937 work by the team of John Murray and Allen Boretz. According to Director Mark Lamos, "Room Service," which ran for 500 performances and was then made into a film starring the Marx Brothers, is a classic American comic farce, and a fitting way to close out the year. If you’re a fan of the “Let’s put on a show / The show must go on!” genre, you should enjoy this one.

  • Bricks Link Newtown Resident’s Past And Present

    Oscar Berendsohn has inserted a piece of family history into his life. On Tuesday, October 22, masons at his Appleblossom Lane home chinked out three bricks near his front door and replaced them with three glazed “clinker” bricks, remnants of his childhood home outside of Hamburg, Germany. Two years ago, he found out that the house was to be razed to make way for a modern container port. The bricks had been carried from Germany to Newtown by a relative who visited Mr Berendsohn last year...