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Way We Were For The Week Ending November 3, 2017

Published: November 2, 2017

The Newtown Bee

November 6, 1992

A Halloween Tour: When Edmond Town Hall projectionist Tom Mahoney needed some livestock for Halloween flavor at last Saturday’s matinee, he called the Paproski farm and a calf appeared. After the show, the calf turned many heads as it walked down the front steps of the theater and then ambled down Main Street. Keeping the calf company was Stephanie Paproski, dressed in a farm outfit, and her parents now have the photographic record of them posted in front of the General Store.

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The time students spend in school may expand, once an analysis of the actual time spent on instruction has been made. The school board, at its workshop meeting on November 4, called for a report on how much time is actually spent on instruction and whether that time allows for the implementation of plans under development and/or provides students with skills needed to compete internationally. The report is due by July and will be based on an analysis made by John Reed, superintendent of schools, and on responses from each school as to its view of student needs.

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The first of 722 inmates to be housed in the new state prison will arrive during the week of November 16, traveling in small groups until cells are filled next January. Warden Frank Crose and Corrections Spokesman Bill Flowers said the first group of 30 inmates will be those allowed to work in the prison kitchen or other services. They will travel in a corrections bus to the Garner Correctional Institution on Nunnawauk Road. They will be shackled and accompanied by Corrections officers, Mr Flowers said.

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It is always astonishing to watch our country’s political apparatus go through its post-election Jekyll-and-Hyde routine. Advertisers who were hurling unmitigated muck at each other at the outset of the week quickly turn to talk of healing and cooperation by week’s end. Those who just days before strove to invent the slightest pretext for hard feelings are suddenly trying their best to squelch even their most heartfelt resentments. Everyone seems to understand that the original animosity was leavened by hyperbole and the final reconciliation rests on grace and good form, if not sincerity.

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The town has hired a company to build the swimming pool at Treadwell Park. Grasso Paving and Landscaping Inc will do the work for $671,090, which was the low bid for the project. First Selectman Zita McMahon said November 4 the work would begin within 10 days and be completed in about three months. The pool is scheduled to open July 1, 1993, she said. Mrs McMahon and Finance Director Benjamin Spragg awarded the bid, based on the recommendations of the Public Building Committee.

 

November 17, 1967

The Board of Finance will meet at 8 pm on Friday, November 17, in the lower meeting room at Edmond Town Hall. A vote will be taken on whether or not the Board should recommend the purchase of the property in Taunton district on which Camp Wipawaug has been conducted. A previous vote has been declared null by Town Counsel Robert Hall. In the first vote, two members favored the purchase, two opposed, and one abstained.

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Ceremonies on both Friday and Saturday at the War Memorial Monument on Main Street provided a double observance of Veterans Day in Newtown. On Friday afternoon the high school band and students marched from the school to the monument, where the band played the national anthem and First Selectman Francis J. Hiney spoke of the significance of Veterans Day. Student Council President Jack Collins gave an appropriate reading, the band played “Military Escort,” a wreath was placed, and taps were sounded. Father Hyl gave a benediction, and the band and students then marched back to the school. On Saturday at 10:45 am a small but appreciative group of townspeople assembled at the monument for a brief but effective ceremony.

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The Board of Education met Tuesday evening, November 14. After routine matters had been covered, PTA Council President Mrs Robert Schmidle brought up a number of matters. The Council asked that time be allowed for parent-teacher conferences in the course of the regular school day. Mrs Schmidle was reminded that double sessions have already shortened the school day. The Council is disturbed at the termination of the adult education program and offered its services to aid in reinstating the program. A “very concerned interest” was expressed in summer programs particularly in the areas of art, typing, and shorthand where there is little opportunity during the year for electives. There was a discussion of difficulties of using the library at the high school since students there are on three different schedules. There was also discussion of allowing high school students to ride the elementary buses home after taking part in activities.

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Many newcomers to town were made well acquainted with the town at a know-your-town program, sponsored by the League of Women Voters on Tuesday, November 14. First Selectman Francis Hiney welcomed the newcomers, close to 100, and said that he hoped when they became better acquainted with the town, many of them would come forward and serve in public office. Miss Mary Lucas, one of the authors of “Newtown, Connecticut,” a history of the town, gave a lively account of Newtown’s past, from the “rather shady business deal,” when the town site was bought from the Indians, to the numerous gifts of Miss Hawley.

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An editor’s desk is sort of like a Grand Central Station for an astounding array of reading material, some, but not all of which finds its way finds its way into the columns of the editor’s publication. As a matter of fact, the flood of news releases seems to mount steadily, making lack of available space the prime reason for blue-penciling much otherwise interesting information. This is unfortunately so in the case of a weekly paper, whose real mission is the dissemination of local news and advertising. Nevertheless, it is often fun for an editor to study newsworthy releases, not only for the worth of their content, but also the source or authors from which they come.

 

November 13, 1942

My dear Mr Hunter: I should like to thank you publicly for your generous gift of thirty dollars to the Newtown Scholarship Association. You and your salvage committee may rest assured it will be put to good use. Yours Sincerely, Frances Stevens Goodsell.

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Close to 75 members and guests of the newly formed Newtown Fish and Game Club met at the Edmond gymnasium on Friday evening for their first meeting. Harry MacClymon, club president, presided. He explained the club’s aims, namely to stock the fields with birds and the streams with fish. Secretary Roger Newland read several communications from the State Superintendent of Fish and Game regarding the securing of necessary birds for the Newtown area. He also told members that a tract of land over 1,000 acres has been secured and will, in the future, be under the club’s jurisdiction.

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The editor of The Bee was pleased to receive recently a letter from Miss M.L. Hawkins, now living in Hartford, who states that she and her family have had The Bee since it first started. It is a compliment to hear from such a loyal subscriber, particularly since Miss Hawkins states that she does not like to miss a single issue of the paper.

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The local Rotary Club reports that 43 overseas packages have been sent to date to Newtown men in the armed forces now stationed abroad. Within the next 10 days, an additional 100 packages will be sent to servicemen stationed in this country. The packages contain a variety of nuts, candy and cookies attractively packaged and approved for overseas mailing. Many letters have been received by the Rotary Club acknowledging receipt of the cartons of cigarettes, of which 138 were sent during the month of October. Birthday cards were also mailed to 20 men.

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The Post Office Department is now starting the most gigantic task in its history — the movement of a deluge of Christmas parcels, cards, and letters, while maintaining the regular flow of millions of pieces of mail daily to and from our armed forces all over the world. Indications are that the Christmas mail volume will be the largest on record. Already in September, the latest month for which figures are available, retail sales had reached a level second only to the record month of December, 1941.

 

November 9, 1917

We are confident that Newtown citizens will respond generously and promptly to the appeal of L.C. Morris and his local canvassers for the great Y.M.C.A. war work. This is a work that appeals to everybody, for from every camp where “our boys” are located, they write home of the great blessing of the Y.M.C.A. camps. President Wilson not only issued a general order, giving the Young Men’s Christian Association a recognized standing in the Army and Navy but he also expressed to the National War Work Council his estimate of the “very high value” of the work the association on behalf of enlisted men.

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E.J. Miller has bought out the long-established milk routes of H.H. Peck, and will begin taking care of the route on Saturday. Mr Peck has given very efficient service, has sold a fine quality of milk and has been faithful and prompt in his delivery. He has conducted the route for six years. Mr Miller will aim to give the public good service. Any man who does this is worth of the full support of the borough people.

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Borough Treasurer W.A. Leonard still lies seriously ill, a fact his many friends will regret to learn.

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The Newtown Equal Franchise League will have a special meeting on Friday, at 3 pm, at Mrs Irwin’s in the Street. A full attendance is desired.

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Miss Jennie Lynch is the new teacher in the Hanover school, beginning her work on November 1.

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com, or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

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