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The Way We Were, for the week ending October 13, 2017

Published: October 13, 2017

October 16, 1992

About 600 people clustered together in groups of 25 to take the tour last Saturday of Garner Correctional Institution. The prison is scheduled to open next month. After closely inspecting heavy steel doors, impenetrably thick glass, and elaborate electronic security devices, townspeople emerging from the tour said the experience was reassuring. The prison looked very secure. Escape by prisoners, which is never impossible, appeared very improbable. Yet the most sophisticated security device available today was not readily apparent on the tour: the capacity of the prison administrators for creativity and innovation in rehabilitating lives gone astray. Warden Frank Crose stands a chance of serving well both inside and outside the walls of his prison. We wish him luck.

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Four federal health care investigators spent three days in a surprise probe at Fairfield Hills Hospital after receiving complaints of alleged substandard care. Bill Roberson with the Health Care Financing Administration and Donald Kristola, branch chief of the survey and certification review, said a team of investigators paid an unsolicited visit to the state mental health hospital about four months earlier than planned. They focused their review on medical records and staffing, they said. Although a federal spokesman would not comment on what they called an “Ongoing investigation,” and would not say what prompted it, a patient advocacy group leader for the Alliance for the Mentally Ill said her organization complained to the federal agency by letter in August. “We are certainly pleased that unannounced visits have been made,” said Katina Zachmanoglou. The group has publicly criticized the hospital for a variety of troubles, including overmedication of patients, violence on the wards, unhygienic conditions, and intimidation and retribution by the staff to patients who speak out.

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The October 23 auction to benefit the Newtown High School European Band Tour will offer a tempting array of goods and services, and organizers are promising a good time. “Come for a fun evening,” said Auctioneer Bob Tendler. “See your friends and bring your wallet.” The auction is sponsored by the Newtown High School Band Parents Association, and features such goodies as hot air balloon rides, 100 gallons of fuel, septic cleaning, and one of 200 leather jackets worn at the 34th Annual Grammy Awards. The auction is at 7 pm at the Fireside Inn. Admission is $5 and includes wine, soda, cheese, coffee, dessert, “and lots of fun,” a flyer states.

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As Christopher Columbus desired to explore the unchartered areas of the globe, so Harley-Davidson motorcycle owners go in search of new horizons. In conjunction with the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s arrival in “the new world,” the Harley Owners Group (HOG) has announced the results of its Discover Your America survey — a look at the top 10 travel destinations in the United States. More than 5,000 HOG owners from across the country responded to the call to select their favorite vacation spots in order to determine America’s best destinations.

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Newtown Youth Services would like to remind participants in the recent Family Bike Day that there is still time to bring in pledge money from the event and win a prize. By submitting the highest amount of pledged donations, participants can win the first place Pepsi Bike; second and third prizes are a Sony Walkman, also donated by Pepsi. Take pledge forms to Newtown Youth Services offices at 41A Main Street

 

October 27, 1967

An intense storm accompanied by thunder and lightning and high winds ripped across the area on Wednesday night, uprooting trees and disrupting power in scores of homes. The greatest damage occurred in the 45-minute period between 11:16 and 11:55 pm. According to Connecticut Light and Power, 290 outages were reported in Newtown for periods of three to eight hours. Damage seemed to be most severe from Hattertown Road to Cod Fish Hill in Bethel. Rock Ridge Country Club sustained severe damage.

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This weekend Eastern Standard Time returns and Bee readers are reminded to turn their clocks back one hour on Saturday night. On Sunday, October 29, the community will be regulated by Eastern Standard time once more. Enjoy the extra hour’s sleep!

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The annual Halloween parade at the Sandy Hook School will be Tuesday afternoon starting at 1:30 o’clock, with all types of spooks and funny faces scheduled to appear. And parents or townspeople interested are invited to watch.

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Mr and Mrs Sydney N. Blumberg of Hattertown District recently visited Bailey, N.C., where they were special guests at a dinner thrown by the Country Doctor Museum board of directors. Mr Blumberg has been named honorary curator and is helping in the restoration of the nineteenth century buildings and making plans for the future exhibits in the doctor’s office and pharmacy.

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Mr and Mrs Willard Johnson have moved from Wakefield House on Route 34 into their new home at 11 Main Street, after extensive remodeling. The house, which for many years was Coach DeGroat’s home, has a glistening new coat of paint and is all spruced up. Newtown welcomes these old Sandy Hook friends to the Borough.

 

October 23, 1942

One would hardly expect it, but Newtown’s Main Street has developed a parking problem, and we believe it is high time something should be done about it. War workers combining rides to Bridgeport have contracted the habit of leaving cars parked for long hours in front of the Congregational Church which is convenient for them but a hazard to others and source of annoyance when the church front should be kept open for funerals and other functions. The Bee has long contended that a sufficient space should also be kept open in front of the Edmond Town Hall and post office so that cars can draw to the curb to discharge passengers rather than be forced to unload near the middle of the road. The town hall has a large parking lot at the rear which should be used by long-term parkers. The need for correcting the situation is imperative.

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Residents of Newtown, as well as a much larger area, will be interested in the announcement that the property of Thomas F. Brew in Sandy Hook Glen has been acquitted by the State of Connecticut for use as a state park. A bill introduced and passed in the last session of the General Assembly provided the necessary appropriation, and the title has been passed, transferring Mr Brew’s property to the State comprising 42 acres along the Pohtatuck River from his house on Dayton Street to the Fabric Fire Hose Company. Mr Brew’s property of some 50 acres on the east side of Route 6 is not included, but the state has acquired his house, allowing him life use of it.

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The series of Open House Teas held on Thursday afternoons at the Hawley Manor are now drawing to a close. Only four more will be held, the last being November 19. If you have not already done so, bring a friend to one of these very sociable afternoons and help boost the canteen equipment fund. By means of these teas and other sources, the sum of $269 has been raised. Mrs Hunter, to whom the canteen owes gratitude for her persistence in raising these funds bit by bit confidently expects to raise $300 before the end of the series.

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Starting a war project to raise wool, the Fairfield County Farm Bureau recently placed some three hundred Western lambs on various farms in the county — hardly expecting a second generation to arrive so soon. And so county agent LeRoy Chapman admits that he was both surprised and pleased when one of H.R. Geiger’s flock of six ewes on Shepherd Hill in Newtown gave birth to twin rams on Sunday. Godfather “Chappie” says his war project has already taken on unexpected proportions, and the Geigers have been busy with their little guests.

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Trinity Church served a delicious turkey dinner in the church rooms last Thursday, under the general chairmanship of Mrs Walter Kiernan. The dining room was attractively decorated with autumn leaves and chrysanthemums, tables were decorated with orange candles, fruit, and vegetables, all donated by parish members. Over 200 people were served and $187 was added to the church treasury.

 

October 19, 1917

Will you send our soldiers some of your good books from your own library, sharing your best friends among books with them; books which would give you pleasure to pass on. Do not wait to be called upon but take them to the library this week. If you can’t get the books to the library, they will be called for, if you will notify Mrs A.G. Muzzy. Books of fiction and drama, sea stories, detective stories, stories of adventure, short stories, especially humorous ones, are much needed. Books of travel, biography, history, aviation, submarining. Books for the uneducated, books for all grades of men. They will be helped by these libraries, so give them such books as men of your own household have read.

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C.W. Canfield has made a neat sign which has been placed on the ridge board of Winter’s restaurant at Hawleyville. This guides the wayfarer and traveling man to the pace to get a good lunch.

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The boys in France are fighting for you. Back them up by buying a Liberty Bond.
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E. J. Miller is to have new plumbing installed in his residence, A.E. Brinton is doing the work.

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A nice stock of Hallowe’en cards, masques, Hallowe’en favors and the like will be found at the Golden Peach.—[Adv.]

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com, or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

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