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The Way We Were, for the week ending June 30, 2017

Published: June 29, 2017

July 3, 1992

Following a controversial Land Use vote, the owner of a Danbury restaurant is withdrawing his application for consideration by the Borough Zoning Board of Appeals and looking elsewhere to expand his business. “It’s a consideration of time, energy, and conflict that I see that is going to continue not only in construction but in completion of the restaurant,” said restaurateur Gary Kurtz, owner of Rosy Tomorrows in Danbury. “There’s a strong possibility that we would end up with a lawsuit [from opposing residents] and the chance we could be defeated. I believe a great majority wanted this facility,” added Mr Kurtz. “It’s only through a very small group of people that it won’t come to pass.”

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Newtown Police Officer John Kotch fed an injured fawn milk while Newtown Canine Officer George Mattegat checked its wounds. Apparently the fawn was injured after it wedged itself between the vertical rails of a wooden fence at the home of Ron and Maryann Ryan on Diamond Drive Tuesday, June 30. Although timid, the fawn readily drank a bowl of milk. According to Mr Ryan, he discovered the fawn that afternoon and believes it may have been stuck in the fence all night. Subsequently, the tiny deer, which suffered minor abrasions above both hips, was transported to Berkshire Veterinary Hospital for treatment.

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There were two types of lines outside of the Edmond Town Hall this week. One was the line of cars along Main Street, and the other was the line of people that snaked out of the lobby and along the sidewalk. Both were caused by the popular film Fried Green Tomatoes, which ran through Thursday, July 2, at the town hall theater. The movie packed them in for matinees and nightly shows. “We’ve had to turn people away,” said Town Hall Manager Edie Schorn. But as popular as the movie was, it couldn’t overtake Beauty And The Beast as the most popular film shown lately.

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Contrary to rumor in some towns, no candidate sites have been investigated or selected for a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) facility. That notice comes from the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Services. According to information sent to the newspapers on June 25, new legislation requires the service to end all previous activities in the site selection process and begin again by developing a new siting plan and then develop a new site screening process. “They’re starting from scratch all over again,” said Public Works Director Fred Hurley. “They still are looking for a solution but it’s not with the same federal urgency there was before.”

 

July 7, 1967

Mr and Mrs Frederick Abbott of Currituck Road will fly to London, Saturday, for at least a month abroad. Mr Abbott will be conducting business for Eagle Pencil, but he and Mrs Abbott hope for a short trip to Scotland and Ireland after business is finished. Their son, Thomas Abbott, will be looking out for the house and canine member of the family, Pat.

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The Fourth of July celebration at the Fenn A. Dickinson Memorial Park will have to be an annual event if last Monday was a “trial balloon” to test townspeoples’ interests. People literally “came out of the woods” for the program, and a steady stream of cars flowed onto the ball field parking lot until reaching a count of almost 700. In addition police estimated another 400 vehicles at selected spots on the roads leading to the park. The cars brought nearly 5,000 people to the park with a great collection of blankets of which were cast about for the spectators on both the lawn and beach area. The great majority chose to stand, milling about the park while waiting for the program to get underway. The fireworks, undeniably the main attraction, got off to a booming start at dark and continued for close to half an hour with a fine display of aerial bursts and booms.

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Mr and Mrs Ellis Gladwin of Hundred Acres Road spent the Fourth visiting Gladwin’s mother in New Rochelle on the occasion of her 100th birthday. While the only fireworks were the popping of champagne corks, it was a festive occasion. Mrs Gladwin Sr has been a frequent visitor in town and her friends send their best congratulations.

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Many Newtown taxpayers have expressed surprise at the size of the tax assessed this year on motor vehicles. One taxpayer reports the value placed on a car to be $300 more than the purchase price. Although some auto tax bills are lower than those of the previous year, enough are appreciably higher to warrant the publication of an explanation. The Assessor’s office reports that until last year the value of the vehicles was established in Wethersfield. When real property in Newtown was assessed at its market value, Charles Goodsell, who supervised the revaluation, felt that motor vehicles should, in all fairness, be included and that the value should be established here.

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The Newtown Summer Recreation Program under the direction of Hans P. Boyce, would like to thank all parents who took the time to register their children early and in the proper manner. This was a big asset in the first day’s registration. The daily recreation program is directed by Carleton Ryder. Recreational and educational programs are adjusted to the ability and interest level from grades one through six include softball, kickball, volleyball, basketball, badminton, running, circle, and tag games, archery, tetherball, tennis, etc.

 

July 3, 1942

A moderately sized but most appreciative audience enjoyed the concert given on Monday evening, June 30, by the Mendelssohn Male Chorus of Waterbury in the Edmond Town Hall Alexandria Room under the expert direction of G. Loring Burwell. The 25-member chorus sang a varied program, opening with Handel’s “Thanks Be To Thee” and including such old favorites as “John Peel,” “The Lord’s Prayer,” and “Land of Home and Glory.”

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It is expected that residents of the town will receive with pleasure, the news that the Board of Finance at its meeting on June 25, recommended an appropriation of $7,000 to provide funds requested by the Board of Education for a temporary building and its equipment, to be erected at the rear of Hawley School so that a course in Domestic Science can be offered to girls next year paralleling the Agricultural course

***

It will be of interest to readers of The Bee to know that Paul Schick, noted artist of Redding, is holding an exhibit of his pictures at the Ridgefield Playhouse from July 1-15. This will be his second exhibit at the Playhouse. His pictures include landscapes and marines, many of them in Connecticut.

***

The Pine Tree Trip this year will be fashioned to fit the spirit of the times. The same number will go, a total of ten, but the old faithful trailer will have to be left home. And bicycles substituted, with the use of the train in some few instances. The destination of the patrol is not yet determined, but it will probably be the White Mountains. All scouts who plan to go or who would like to be candidates should contact Mr Cullens at once. The trip will start in the afternoon of July 19 and last two weeks.

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The use of the State Highway Department picnic areas has been suggested for motorists who are in danger of losing all opportunity for rural outings and picnics during the war period. To assist in this use, the State Highway Department has continued the issuance of its picnic area maps which were first introduced in 1940.

 

July 6, 1917

On Wednesday, the closing exercises were held at the Half Way River district school and it was a most enjoyable affair in spite of the fact that the heavy rain necessitated carrying out the entire program in the house. The school room was very prettily decorated with flags and flowers. Prizes were given to James Beardsley and Harold Loveland for a perfect record and to Alice Wagner and Albert Eichler for gathering and bringing to school the largest number and variety of shrub flowers.

***

E.C. Northrop has the contract for building a new house for M.D. Morgan at Botsford. A telephone has been installed in the residence of Charles R. Crowthers on the Huntingtown Road.

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The Diamond Match Co.’s factory at Southford is closed for two months to make necessary repairs. This factory has run night and day for 16 years under the able and popular superintendence of John King. This is a fine company to work for as the company carries $1,000 insurance for each employee and pays a Christmas bonus. Mr King has been successful in the management of the Southford plant.

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Taking advantage of the absence of his family, thieves invaded the property at A.P. Smith on the Fourth, stripping two trees of cherries and taking peas from his garden. The Editor will pay a reward of $5 for evidence that will lead to the conviction of the guilty parties. Is it getting to the point, that for anyone living on the state road to have to have any garden or fruit stuff for his own use, he must maintain an armed guard or surround his property with an eight-foot fence?

***

The store of Morris & Shepard in the Street was burglarized, Tuesday night, and some $70 worth of automobile tires and inner tubes were stolen, in addition to small articles. It is about time that Newtown citizens got together to organize an anti-burglar and theft detective association.

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com, or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

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