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The Way We Were, for the week ending February 10, 2017

Published: February 13, 2017

The Newtown Bee

February 14, 1992

Due to Newtown residents’ increasing concerns about the traffic on Main Street, borough officials and police have launched a joint effort to solve the problem. “The reason I initiated this is the safety factor is abominable,” Borough Burgess Gretchen Hyde said, speaking as a concerned resident of Main Street during the borough board’s meeting Tuesday, February 11. According to Ms Hyde, she worries about children crossing the street every day, as well as those who regularly attend Lathrop School of Dance at the Edmond Town Hall. Ms Hyde believes the speed and volume of traffic is a problem. Borough Warden Joan Crick has looked into better illumination with Connecticut Light & Power Company. Additional lighting would make pedestrians more visible, according to Ms Crick. Police Lieutenant Dave Lydem agreed with the idea and added that officials should seek the installation of two more street lights.

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Former First Selectman Rod Mac Kenzie has resigned as Town Manager of Salisbury, Mass. The resignation comes on the heels of an indictment following an FBI probe in which it is alleged that Mr Mac Kenzie helped defraud a Connecticut bank in a 1987 land deal. Salisbury selectman Donald Beaulieu said his town is beset with financial problems and that by resigning, Mr Mac Kenzie has allowed the town to chart its own course. “Mr Mac Kenzie was saying, ‘Maybe you can now go in the direction you want to go.’ That’s my impression,” Mr Beaulieu said. The five-member board of selectman disagreed with the way Mr Mac Kenzie was handling town affairs. His resignation letter pointed to “longstanding differences” between himself and selectmen that stem from a contractual agreement selectmen failed to sign after Mr Mac Kenzie took office last year. He said he resigned before selectmen united to fire him.

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The increase in foreclosures over the last year has been cited as a direct result of our disrupted economy. “Absolutely, without a doubt, it’s directly related,” said Newtown Tax Collector Carol Mahoney. From January to December, 1991, there were 35 foreclosures in Newtown, nearly twice the number recorded for 1990. Foreclosures are the bank’s final step taken when a mortgage is unpaid, and according to bank officials, it is a last resort. The bank in turn sells the property to collect money to pay off the mortgage and expenses. “We have seen an increase in foreclosures,” said Gary Fetzer, Center Bank corporate communication director and town selectman, said. “We are trying to work with people who have trouble, so it doesn’t get to that stage.”

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To the editor: I received documentation from First Selectman Zita McMahon that she moved to fund safe radar guns for Newtown police. I am not an aggressive person. I wish someone had informed me of the resolution so that I did not have to write the letter. I am extremely pleased that Zita considered the traffic situation bad enough to take action to correct it. Respectfully, Spiro Lukeris.

 

February 17, 1967

WACKY WEATHER The weatherman was playing scales on the thermometer this week. Unofficial temperatures of 22 degrees below zero were reported in town Monday and the snow that had previously fallen took on the consistency of granite. Cars failed to start, water pipes froze, and heating systems ran overtime. By Wednesday however, the fickle weather man relented. Melting snow ran underfoot in rivulets and the temperature soared to 56 degrees. As The Bee goes to press, we are told to prepare for another roller-coaster temperature dip.

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A beautiful day to own a Volkswagen station wagon. On Monday, January 24, 1966, an estimated 262,825,033 tons of snow fell upon the United States of America. In Fraser, Colorado, a VW station wagon that stood for days in temperatures of 25 below, started up without a tremble. In Scarsdale, a lonely VW was blazing a trail to the commuter station. In Albany, a VW took 8 angry neighbors down to the local service station for 8 sets of chains. On Monday, January 24, not too many Volkswagens were sold in the United States. On Tuesday, things picked up.

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Obstinacy is the strength of the weak-minded.

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Hibernating? No! Winter Schedule? Yes! We’re here most days, but at no regular time. A telephone call MAY reach us — a post card certainly will. Browsers who will brave the snowdrifts are welcome (it’s warm inside) but should call first. Selling, buying book search, book binding as usual by mail or by appointment. The Christmas Tree Shop, Bethlehem.

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Newtown’s economics class visited Chas. W. Scranton and Company in Danbury on February 1 to acquaint the students with the workings of a stock brokerage firm. Berkely Hill Jr explained the various machines which are necessary to a brokerage house. These included the Telequote which instantly gives data on certain stocks. The stock board, with quotations from the New York and American Exchanges, was also explained.

 

February 13, 1942

Despite Saturday’s heavy storm, Rev. Paul A. Cullens seized the opportunity to roll the snow on the community skating rink, and on Sunday afternoon when the temperature had fallen, the flooding operation was started, with Mr Cullens, Paul S. Smith, and a number of helpers manning the hose until early Monday morning. As a result skating was enjoyed on the rink on Monday afternoon and evening. The surface was flooded that night and each night since, so that smooth skating has been enjoyed all week long by a large number of skaters.

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A call to prayer goes out to all people. You are invited to join in the fellowship of prayer the world around on the World Day of Prayer, February 20, 1942. Time: 3 to 4 pm, Congregational Church, Newtown. The World Day of Prayer program has been prepared by three women now living in the United States; their chairman a former teacher in China, now a professor in a Biblical Seminary; the wife of a German pastor, imprisoned in a concentration camp abroad, her husband in another, both now doing pastoral work in the United States. Their younger son is still imprisoned in a concentration camp; and a French woman who has had no word from her family in France for over a year. Out of this rich background of faith in the face of discouragements and dangers they have prepared this 1942 program.

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The Bethel high school boys’ basketball team came through with a close victory over the Morris Five on Tuesday evening at the Edmond gym and thus gained the first half championship of the Housatonic Valley Schoolmen’s League. The final score of 20-13 came only after a tightly contested game which found Bethel superior in the closing two periods both in defensive and offensive play.

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Keep ‘Em Flying. It has recently been called to The Bee’s attention that display of the American flag is the exception, rather than the rule. And so the reminder is made to those who forget to raise a flag on Lincoln’s birthday, that Washington’s birthday will soon be here. And for those who can do so, it is suggested that an American flag flying in the breeze on any day affords an inspiration to those who see it. A patriotic gesture well worth the while.

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Friends of Mrs Morris Beers will be glad to know that she is recovering nicely from the grippe.

 

February 16, 1917

An event almost tragic in its results occurred at Shepaug station on the Litchfield branch Monday night, in the zero weather. A lady about 60 years old came in from New York and left the train at Shepaug station. Conductor Ives told her that it did not look as if there was anyone there to meet her, but she persisted in getting off. When his train went up the branch Tuesday morning, he found her unconscious on the floor of the little station. She was put on board and taken to Washington and Dr Werse be summoned. In the afternoon she was taken to Danbury hospital. The fingers on her left hand were frozen and will have to be amputated. Her feet will be saved. Her name was Josephine McAlvoy and she was going to work, it is said, for some family in Bridgewater, who evidently had not received word that she was coming. It was a pitiful place for an aged lady to be alone in an Arctic night like that of Monday.

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ERECT A BIRD HOUSE. It is just the time to put up a bird house for the first blue bird. There’s never a spring but what the birds come north again.

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The Young Men’s Club of Sandy Hook will give a dance at St Mary’s hall on Monday night. The Fox orchestra of Danbury will furnish the music and a first-class time is assured.

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Leon Nalevsky, who has been sick and under the care of Dr F.J. Gale, is now gaining.

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The Ladies’ Aid society will meet for sewing with Mrs L.C. Morris on Thursday afternoon. A barrel of bedding and clothing is to be sent to a school in Joppa, Ala., about the first of March. Anyone having second-hand clothing in good condition may leave it with Miss Scudder.

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com, or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

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