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  • Director And Actor Celebrate Two Decades Of Collaboration

    "I Hate Hamlet," the current production by Town Players of Newtown at The Little Theatre, is the 20th full-length play at the Orchard Hill Road theater in which director Ruth Anne Baumgartner has had the pleasure of directing actor Rob Pawlikowski. She has directed other actors multiple times, but none more than the Roxbury resident who has become her “A-list” choice and personal friend. It is, no doubt, not the last time that the two will collaborate to bring entertainment and thoughtful contemplation to local audiences. A rapport built on mutual respect has created a bond that makes Ms Baumgartner frequently pencil in Mr Pawlikowski’s name when contemplating a play selection, and one in which the actor is loathe to turn down an opportunity to work with her, no matter how much of a character stretch she asks him to make.

  • Parade Committee Hoping For Financial Support From Residents

    What would you do, if you had only a third of the funds necessary to present a $30,000 event? If you are the Newtown Labor Day Parade Committee, you would have faith, and move forward with the plans for the 53rd annual parade, scheduled to put its best foot forward Monday, September 1, at 10 am.

  • Dennis DeYoung Visits: Two Theatrical Firsts Prepping To Premiere In Newtown

    Rock star Dennis DeYoung has performed before millions of fans as a musician and actor; has been honored with a number one hit and People’s Choice Award for his touching ballad, “Babe” as a member of the rock band Styx; and has contributed his creative talents to full-scale musical productions. But he told The Newtown Bee this week that one of the most touching and memorable experiences of his career occurred July 12 when he visited Newtown to sit in on a rehearsal of The 12.14 Foundation’s read-through of a brand new version of The 101 Dalmatians Musical, for which he wrote the score. Performances of "Dalmatians," as well as "A ROCKIN' Midsummer Night's Dream," are in rehearsals, with more than 100 Newtown children working alongside Broadway professionals for shows that will be performed over the first two weekends of August.

  • Snapshot: Kyle O'Connor

    A weekly profile of a local person.

  • The Top of the Mountain

    Newtown, from a cat's point of view.

  • The Way We Were

    A look back at Newtown 25, 50, 75, and 100 years ago.

  • Theater Review— Bad People Worth Catching In A Good Play: ‘Bonnie And Clyde’ A Strong Production

    Marilyn Hart and Adam Stordy are the famous gunslinging outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who are in turns loving and playful and angry and quarrelsome in Adam Peck's play about the pair, currently in production at TheatreWorks New Milford. As the titular characters come to terms with the inevitability of a losing confrontation with the law, they spend time holed up in a barn as fugitives. Taking poignant and awkward steps towards intimacy as they try repeatedly to connect, the play offers a glimpse of the vulnerability and naiveté of two of America’s most infamous criminals.

  • Shortts Phase Out Garden Center To Focus On Connecticut-Grown Farm Fare

    After several challenging years straddling two separate agricultural industries, Jim and Sue Shortt of Sandy Hook have gone with their gut — settling on the line of products they hope will please everyone else’s gut, that is. The popular Riverside Road farm and garden center has formally phased out its garden supply component, and has stocked the coolers, shelves and bins of their new farm stand with fresh Newtown and Connecticut-grown veggies and fruits. To supplement their stock, the Shortt family has developed relationships with numerous state specialty food makers who are supplying the Newtown store with a cornucopia of products from trail mix to jams, milk, sauces and, of course, Ferris Acres Creamery ice cream.

  • Tiny House Appeals To Couple’s Sense Of Adventure

    Luise and Shawn Gleason plan on running away. This summer, the Gleasons will build their own tiny traveling house, and take it with them wherever they go. During a recent interview, the couple flipped through glossy pages of blueprints and design features for mini homes — living rooms, kitchens, bedrooms or lofts, all downsized to (in the Gleasons’ case) roughly 170 square feet. Mr Gleason pointed to tape marks on the floor, where he had mapped out the footprint of their soon-to-be tiny house, named The Runaway Shanty. Its length was about ten casual paces, and its width slightly wider than Mr Gleason’s outstretched arms. Their design concept is based on the Cypress design through the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company. Already prepped and insulated is the trailer that will carry their tiny house. Walking between the tape marks, Ms Gleason started at one end of the space, and described what she envisioned.

  • ‘Safety Town,’ For Students Entering Kindergarten, Offers A Multitude Of Lessons

    Parents can never be sure how their children will react to their first day of kindergarten. Some children hop on the bus without hesitation, and maybe slow down long enough to give a wave to their anxious parents before starting a new adventure with future friends. Others will cling, or cry, or worse, making the first day difficult for everyone involved. A five-day, ten-hour program being offered this month by Newtown Youth & Family Services (NYFS) hopes to make that big transition much smoother for parents and children alike. Safety Town will be offered at NYFS during the weeks of July 21–25 and July 28–August 1. It will meet Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 am each day. Safety Town was developed in 1964 as a national program to teach young children important lessons on traffic, fire, water, bus, and bicycle safety, awareness of medicine and poison, and awareness of strangers. But it has an added benefit.