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CT Mirror

  • 227 CT Gun Deaths Later, Newtown Families Continue Their Campaign

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy are giving fellow senators pins that show how many people in their state have been killed by guns since Adam Lanza shot 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School nearly two years ago.

    The senators’ own pins bear the number 227.

    Mr Blumenthal said he and Mr Murphy are distributing the pins to pressure Congress to act on gun control.

  • Op-Ed: We Owe A Big Debt To Veterans — And Should Pay It

    A warm Sunday night in Hartford, August 7, 1932. Several dozen men and women — exhausted, dirty, hungry — trudge into the city after the long trip from Washington, D.C. They have just made history.

    Along with 45,000 other military veterans and their families, they camped for several months to press the federal government for long-promised aid. Specifically, they want the immediate release of cash payments (the Bonus) promised to them after World War I.

  • A New Twist: Foley Embraces Q-Poll Tie, Denies Ever Holding Lead

    How’s this for bipartisanship: Republican Tom Foley and Democrats supporting Governor Dannel P. Malloy agree that Quinnipiac University’s poll declaring the race a tie is accurate — and that last month’s survey giving Foley a six-point lead was faulty.

    “I think this poll is right on,” Foley said. “We never had a six-point lead.”

  • Keno’s Repeal Is No Longer A Sure Bet In Connecticut

    Keno, the unwanted child of Connecticut politics, vilified by gambling opponents and publicly defended by no major political figure, improbably remains alive as the General Assembly begins the last two weeks of the 2014 session.

    The leaders of the House and Senate, after calling for the repeal of the electronic lottery game after an improving revenue forecast in January indicated the state could afford to forgo new gambling income, now are hedging their bets.

  • Questions (And Answers) About CT’s New Girls’ Detention Unit

    When the state’s child welfare agency announced it needed to open a locked facility for troubled girls who break the law, state legislators had a list of questions they needed answers to if they were going to give the Department of Children and Families the $2.6 million needed each year to operate the center.

    Weeks later, the state agency has answered the 20 questions posed to them by legislators, the General Assembly’s budget-writing committee has signed off on funding the new program, and girls now live at the 12-bed facility.

  • CT Poised To Adopt $10.10 Minimum Wage Wednesday

    HARTFORD — With votes scheduled Wednesday, Connecticut is poised to become the first state to adopt a $10.10 minimum wage, delivering on an election-year priority of Gov Dannel P. Malloy.

    The Democratic leaders of the Senate and House plan final votes Wednesday, first in the Senate and immediately following in the House, spokesmen for the two Democratic majority caucuses said Monday.

  • Connecticut Plans To Launch Open Data Portal

    Every time an inmate enters or leaves a correction facility in Connecticut, a database is updated so the state has an accurate count of its incarcerated population. And each day, those numbers are used to produce a chart on the state’s website.

  • Malloy Works To Appease Teachers In 2014

    Governor Dannel P. Malloy’s calculated decision to make a public show of challenging unionized teachers two years ago still dogs the first-term Democratic governor as he prepares for a 2014 re-election he cannot win without support from organized labor.

    Gov Malloy, who walked a picket line on the summer day he won the Democratic primary in 2010 and forcefully defended workers during a recent lockout at Lawrence + Memorial Hospital, gets stellar reviews for many policies from key union leaders.

  • First Storm Of 2014 Tested CT's New 'Flying Ice' Ban

    Besides leaving 10 inches of snow on the ground by Friday evening, Connecticut’s first winter storm of 2014 also should test the state’s new effort to control flying ice on its highways.

    According to a new law that took effect last week, truck drivers could be fined up to $1,250 if accumulated ice dislodges and causes damage to a person or to another vehicle.

  • When Connecticut’s Budget Realities Follow Tragedies

    State legislators sprang into action after the Newtown tragedy, allocating nearly $19 million for an array of initiatives on school safety, mental health and gun control.

    For the third time in six years lawmakers spoke decisively – and in bipartisan fashion – about crucial reforms made in response to tragedy.

    But with a sluggish recovery and a significant budget deficit looming after the 2014 elections, will those Newtown initiatives survive?