Home

FOI

  • State Police Ordered To Release Documents In School Shooting Probe

    HARTFORD (AP) — The state Freedom of Information Commission has ruled that Connecticut State Police must release personal documents seized from the Sandy Hook School shooter’s home during the investigation of 12/14.

    The agency ruled Wednesday, May 13, in favor of The Hartford Courant. Efforts by The Courant to obtain the documents since January 2014 had been blocked by the state Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection.

  • Time For A Leadership Change On Commission On Aging

    To the Editor:

  • Failing An FOI Pop Quiz

    Connecticut’s Freedom of Information Act has been on the books for nearly 40 years. A couple of generations of public servants have been operating under its provisions. Yet after decades of illumination by the state’s Sunshine Laws, our elected and appointed representatives in government continue to wander into the shadows, where they stumble over provisions of the act that should be well known to everyone by now.

  • State Senate Leader Opposes Privacy Bill As Affront To FOI

    Senate President Pro Tem Donald E. Williams Jr. testifying against a bill that he says would erode the Freedom of Information Act.

    In testimony delivered in quick succession Monday to two legislative committees, Senate President Pro Tem Donald E. Williams Jr., D-Brooklyn, strongly condemned post-Newtown legislation that would restrict public access to 9-1-1 recordings, police photographs and names of witnesses in drug or violent crimes.

  • Connecticut Supreme Court To Hear Police Reports Case

    HARTFORD (AP) — The state Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether police in Connecticut can withhold arrest reports from the public and just issue press releases instead, while prosecutions are pending.

    Journalists are calling the case critical for reporters being able to get arrest reports quickly, and for the public’s right to know how their police departments operate. Justices are set to hear the case Thursday.

  • Judge Seeks To Hear 911 Calls From 12/14 Before Ruling

    NEW BRITAIN – A Connecticut judge said November 8 that he wants to hear the 911 recordings from the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting before ruling whether they can remain secret as a state prosecutor and the town of Newtown fight an order to release them.

    The state's Freedom of Information Commission ruled in September that the recordings should be provided to The Associated Press, but a prosecutor asked for a stay while he appeals that order.

  • Library Board Needs To Come Out In The Open

    To the Editor:

  • State FOI Lawyer: Release Newtown 911 Calls

    HARTFORD — An attorney with Connecticut’s Freedom of Information Commission has recommended the release of 911 recordings from the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting on December 14, 2012, siding with The Associated Press in a dispute over records withheld by investigators.

    The full, nine-member commission is to hold a September 25 hearing before issuing its final decision on whether the recordings should be handed over to the AP.

  • 12/14 Death Certificates Released

    Following a lengthy legal battle, the town has provided copies of death certificates for the 28 people who died during the violent incidents of last December 14 in Sandy Hook.

    On June 18, applicants representing news organizations including The Hartford Courant and CNBC  received certified copies of the death certificates at the town clerk’s office.

  • Hartford Comes Through

    In an impressive display of conscience and consensus, Connecticut’s Legislature passed legislation on the final day of its session Wednesday that will put photographs and other media that lay bare the graphic and gruesome details of the 12/14 massacre at Sandy Hook School beyond the reach of those employing the state’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to secure their release. With only four dissenters in both chambers, the state Senate and House voted to exempt these materials not only in the Sandy Hook case, but for all homicides in the state.