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regional dispatch

  • Keep The Dispatch Center In Town

    To the Editor:

    Our Newtown dispatchers do an amazing job! They are your lifeline to all 911 calls. Why would we even consider moving our dispatch center out of town? These men and women that work to answer our questions and keep us safe will lose their jobs .

  • Is This How We Reward Excellence?

    To the Editor:

    I am writing this letter in response to the article concerning the moving from local dispatch to regional dispatch for the following: Fire and Police Departments, Ambulance and Dive Team. A committee consisting of Jeff Capeci, Neil Chaudhary and unofficially Maureen Will have recommended outsourcing these dispatch functions to a site located in Torrington. I have a few questions which need to be answered and should be answered before our first selectman and her board finalize their decision:

  • Some Points Of Clarification On Regional Dispatch

    To the Editor:

    In response to: “Despite Opposition Selectmen Advised to Pursue Regional Dispatch Study,” [Bee, 8/22/14].

    Some points that need clarification from the Board of Selectmen meeting on August 18th:

  • Fire Officials Raise Several Concerns On Proposed Dispatching Change

    Fire officials are expressing a range of concerns about a proposal to shift the town's radio dispatching for emergency 911, police, fire, and ambulance calls from the Newtown Emergency Communications Center at 3 Main Street to the Northwest Connecticut Public Safety Communication Center, Inc, at Route 68 in Prospect, which is about 25 miles away.

  • Fire Officials Raise Concerns About Regional Dispatch Proposal

    Fire officials this week voiced concerns about the implications of a proposal to have the town’s radio dispatching for emergency 911, police, fire, and ambulance calls move about 25 miles from the Newtown Emergency Communications Center at 3 Main Street to the Northwest Connecticut Public Safety Communication Center, Inc at Route 68 in Prospect.

  • Nickels Or Pickles?

    A fundamental rule of communication is that the quality of information depends on the path it travels. Direct is better than circuitous. Primary sources are better than secondary or tertiary sources. We learn this as kids by playing the “telephone” game, passing a word or phrase ear-to-ear around a circle transforming nickels into pickles, church steeples into birch people, and giving everyone a good laugh along the way.

  • Police Officials Skeptical About Dispatching Change

    Police Commission members this week discussed the many issues stemming from a proposal to move local emergency radio dispatching for 911 police, fire, and ambulance calls from Newtown to a private, nonprofit, nonunionized dispatching center in Prospect, generally expressing skepticism that such a change would be beneficial.

  • Regionalized Emergency Dispatching Proposal Draws More Fire

    The Newtown Police Union opposes a town proposal that would have municipal emergency radio dispatching for 911, police, fire, and ambulance calls regionalized at a privately owned dispatching center in Prospect.

    The town has proposed regionalization as a cost-savings measure which would reduce spending by approximately $149,000 annually.

  • Regional Dispatching Plan Raises Concerns

    Although town officials have long been exploring the prospect of regionalizing municipal emergency radio dispatching for 911, police, fire, and ambulance calls to improve cost efficiency, Police Commission members this week voiced strong concerns about it, stressing that such an arrangement could do more harm than good in terms of town police operations.

  • Newtown Moves Closer To Emergency Dispatch Consolidation

    State officials serving on the Municipal Opportunities and Regional Efficiencies (MORE) Commission, a panel convened by House Speaker J. Brendan Sharkey (D-Hamden), announced a number of proposals May 23 that could help municipalities cut costs and ultimately save taxpayer dollars.