• Newtown Foster Parents Honored By DCF

    There is an art to successful foster parenting, and Newtown residents Nancy and John Schreiner have seemingly mastered it, despite having fostered just two teenagers in the four years they have been licensed. So much so, that the Department of Children and Families (DCF) named the couple as the Star Family for the month of April, and during the May 1-2 Connecticut Association of Foster and Adoptive Parents Annual Conference at the Mystic Marriott, the Schreiners will be honored as the Family of the Year for the Danbury region.

  • Mental Health Services Where They Are Needed

    Hartford’s response to 12/14 took two distinct paths. Ironically, the path fraught with contention and strife — a package of stricter gun laws — was chosen quickly, by a determined governor working with the advantage of legislative majorities in the state House and Senate and political tailwinds emerging from the storm of shock and sorrow following the Sandy Hook tragedy.

  • In Response To 12/14: DCF Unveils Plan For Overhaul Of Children’s Mental Health Care

    A new state blueprint for children’s mental health services recommends standardized screening and enhanced school services, better training for all caregivers and the “pooling” of hundreds of millions in public funds to more effectively finance vital programs.

  • Questions (And Answers) About CT’s New Girls’ Detention Unit

    When the state’s child welfare agency announced it needed to open a locked facility for troubled girls who break the law, state legislators had a list of questions they needed answers to if they were going to give the Department of Children and Families the $2.6 million needed each year to operate the center.

    Weeks later, the state agency has answered the 20 questions posed to them by legislators, the General Assembly’s budget-writing committee has signed off on funding the new program, and girls now live at the 12-bed facility.

  • Senate Passes Additional Newtown-Related Bills

    HARTFORD (AP) — Connecticut lawmakers on Thursday began building on a package of reforms the General Assembly passed in April that addressed the Newtown school shooting, requiring annual firearms safety training for armed security in local schools and improvements in mental health services for children.

    Senate Minority Leader John McKinney (R-Fairfield), whose district includes Newtown, said 12/14 helped bring to light gaps and shortcomings in the state’s mental health system affecting young people.