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Fred Hurley

  • Road Budget Request Rebounds; Grand List Error Noted

    First Selectman Pat Llodra and Public Works Director Fred Hurley sat down with the Board of Finance on February 9 to try to unravel some confusion that has developed regarding premature road “delamination,” which originally resulted in postponed spending for local road projects in the coming year’s budget.

  • A Long Winter Storm Eases Up On Newtown

    A pair of state plow trucks head east along Church Hill Road (State Route 6) late Monday morning. Snow was falling by daybreak February 9, slowed during the mid morning hours, but picked up again by late morning and remained steady all afternoon.


  • WSA Poised To Approve Hawleyville Sewer Planning

    After years of discussion and months of technical planning, the Water & Sewer Authority (WSA) is poised to give its consulting engineering firm approval to draw the final plans for extending the Hawleyville sanitary sewer system.

    The municipal facilities project is intended to foster economic development in the section of town near the Exit 9 interchange of Interstate 84.

  • WSA Meeting Tonight: Developer Wants To Build 350 Dwellings At 79 Church Hill Road

    Based on engineering data submitted to the Water & Sewer Authority (WSA) on a high-density multifamily housing complex proposed for a 35-acre site at 79 Church Hill Road, the developer is seeking to construct 350 dwellings there.

    Fred Hurley, town director of public works, said the WSA would formally receive that application for wastewater treatment capacity from 79 Church Hill Road, LLC, at its meeting slated for 7 pm on Thursday, February 5, at the sewage treatment plant office building at 24 Commerce Road. 

  • Town To Post Bicycling Safety Signs On Selected Roads

    After the warm weather returns, the town plans to start installing a series of informational signs on local roads intended to promote bicycling safety.

    The signs graphically depict a bicyclist and an auto moving side-by-side on the road, indicating that Connecticut law requires there to be a minimum three-foot separation distance between motor vehicles and bicycles when the motor vehicles are passing bicycles.

  • Newtown Dodges Juno’s Worst, Residents Cooperate With Travel, Parking Bans

    This summary of Winter Storm Juno also appears in The Newtown Bee print edition of January 30, 2015. Stories by Bee Editorial staff were also posted online as the storm approached, arrived and then dispersed earlier this week.

     

    On an electronic weather map, the distance between Newtown and Norwich appears to be scant inches.

  • Plowing Snow Onto Roadways Illegal, Dangerous

    In a statement, police said this week that plowing snow from private driveways and walkways onto roadways is illegal and dangerous.

    Private snowplow drivers and homeowners are legally liable when snow is plowed onto roadways. Such incidents may result in $50 fines, per incident, based on state law, police said.

    Police urge that the snow plowed at a property be kept on that property.

  • Winter Storm Warning Issued, Events Being Cancelled Or Postponed

    A storm system that has already dropped heavy snow on parts of the southern Plains will continue to develop as it moves up the Eastern Seaboard late Friday into Saturday, according to the National Weather Service (NWS).

    “The system has the potential to bring a wintry mix of precipitation to the Mid-Atlantic and New England [regions], though it is not expected to be a major snow producer,” NWS had posted on its website Friday afternoon.

  • Developer Sues, Seeking To Expand Sewer District

    A land development firm has sued the Water & Sewer Authority (WSA), seeking to have a judge order the WSA to expand the municipal sanitary sewer service district so that all of a 35-acre parcel at 79 Church Hill Road is placed within the sewer district, not just a three-acre section of the parcel, as is now the case.

  • Road Durability Issue Raises Town Spending Concerns

    In light of the deteriorated condition of some repaved local roads, whose asphalt surfaces have been degrading much sooner than would normally be expected, the town public works director is expressing caution about spending large sums for extensive road repaving projects while road durability remains in question.