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Sherman Players

  • Theater Review: Nostalgia And Comfort For The Holiday Season

    SHERMAN —  On a very cold, rainy and dark Saturday night last weekend, comfort and warmth for the weary holiday soul was being served up at Sherman Playhouse by way of a heartwarming production of It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play, adapted by Philip Grecian. The movie is one of my all-time favorites, so I was excited to see the words played out as a live radio broadcast. I was not disappointed.

  • Theater Review: A Cast United By Strengths, In Sherman’s ‘Estate’

    SHERMAN — Stella Gordon vehemently believes that a house divided cannot stand. She ferociously protects her domain while her recalcitrant family dukes it out to get what they think they have coming to them. Thus is the premise of Horton Foote’s Dividing the Estate, now being presented by The Sherman Players.

  • Theater Review: Not So Plain In The Plain States

    A befuddled and loving dad, H.C. Curry (Jeff Rossman, left) is the figurehead of a family trying to find love and companionship during a personal and environmental dry spell in The Rainmaker. His two sons, Noah (William H. Greenridge IV, second from right) and Jimmy (Thomas Ovitt, right), like their father, want to a mate for their adored yet “plain” sister Lizzie (Stacy-Lee Frome), who is on the brink of being an old maid. Performances by The Sherman Players continue weekends, plus one Thursday night, until August 10.

  • Theater Review: Running In Circles, Eliciting Laughs In Sherman

    SHERMAN — Philip King’s See How They Run, written in the 1940s, was considered a farce because its plot requires the frequent use of four doors, a chest, and mistaken identities.

  • Theater Review: Sherman’s Third Panto, ‘Aladdin’ Continues A Great Tradition

    SHERMAN — For the third year in a row, The Sherman Players are presenting a “Christmas Panto” — something that is traditional in Britain, and hopefully will become a tradition here as well, since the two that I’ve seen (last year’s Cinderella, and this year’s Aladdin) — are rollicking good fun, designed to entertain young children, but delightful fun for grownups as well.

  • Theater Review: Fine Acting Brings Out Absurd Characters In Sherman’s ‘The Maids’

    SHERMAN — In the post World War II decades when France was the epicenter of revolutionary fervor — cultural, political, moral and philosophical — the Theater of the Absurd was born.

  • Theater Review: Sherman Offering Good Entertainment With "Run For Your Wife"

    SHERMAN — Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive…