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economic development

  • Housing At Fairfield Hills

    In the ten years since Newtown purchased the state-owned property that served Connecticut for more than 60 years as a psychiatric hospital, the evolution of 186-acre campus at Fairfield Hills has been mostly municipal. The site is now the seat of Newtown’s government. Attempts to stimulate commercial interest there, however, have sputtered. The one notable exception was the opening of the 86,000-square-foot Newtown Youth Academy in 2008. But now, there is even talk of an eventual town takeover of that facility as well.

  • A Development Opportunity At Fairfield Hills

    To the Editor:

  • Housing Is Still A Bad Idea For FFH

    To the Editor:

    They are talking about housing at Fairfield Hills Campus again!  They never give up. Mainly the Economic Development Commission, the Planning and Zoning Commission , and the Fairfield Hills Authority.

  • New Leadership Stresses ‘Open For Business’ Commitment

    From right, First Selectman Pat Llodra, Director of Planning George Benson, Economic Development Coordinator Betsy Paynter, and Grant Coordinator Christal Preszler welcome potential business developers to meet this new local team committed to supporting responsible, environmentally sound development, creating a strong local economy and increasing the tax base to offset the residential tax burden for residents.                

  • A Shift In Newtown’s Bureaucracy

    There is a strip of open space that runs from the south to the north and east, skirting behind the ball fields at Reed Intermediate School, along Old Farm Road by open fields toward the point near Commerce Road where the Pootatuck River joins Deep Brook. Conservation Commission Chair Ann Astarita told The Bee last week that she is particularly concerned about this tract, known as the Deep Brook Open Space. It is supposed to protect Deep Brook, one of just nine Class I trout streams in the state.

  • Officials Ramping Up Focus On New Businesses, Economic Development

    With deliberations and the authorization by voters of the 2014-15 budget behind them, local officials are focusing intensely on the best way they see for keeping residential taxation in check — growing the Newtown Grand List. That means increasing commercial activity, supporting economic development, and aggressively working to retain or expand businesses already established locally.

  • The Long Game In Hawleyville

    Keeping a growing community on course toward a promising future requires our elected leaders to engage in both short-game tactics and long-game strategy. The short game draws our attention each year at this time as the Board of Education, Board of Finance, and the Legislative Council try to hold down the tax rate without gutting services in ways that amount to negligence. It is a matter of getting out information and then getting out the vote. The long game, however, may ultimately affect the overall vitality of the community in more profound and lasting ways.