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The Way We Were

March 17, 1989

It took 18 years — and a proposal for a raised ranch — but the Hattertown Historic District Commission finally has adopted regulations for the review of new construction proposed for this colonial neighborhood. The regulations also provide for the review of changes to the exteriors of existing buildings and for demolition plans. Other things, ranging from the size and location of outdoor advertising signs and bill posters, to additional parking established for business use, also will require bills of appropriateness.

 

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On March 13, after parking her Chevy Blazer in the middle of the driveway leading from her house on Butterfield Road, Renee Cramer temporarily prevented a Nello Carting garbage truck from leaving her yard. Mrs Cramer said she was trying to get the company’s attention, regarding her request for reimbursement for the company’s breaking a basketball pole in her yard.

 

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Like other stores in the Northeast, stores in Newtown got rid of their Chilean fruit earlier this week, after learning that traces of cyanide were found in Chilean seedless, red grapes in Philadelphia. The cyanide was discovered after an anonymous threat was called into the US Embassy in Santiago, Chile. The US FDA said the amount of cyanide found was less than would make a small child sick. Newtown Fruit & Flounder, the Grand Union, and A&P cleared their shelves of Chilean fruit on March 14.

 

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First Selectman Rod Mac Kenzie’s refusal to let a police officer see the town’s fire log has been criticized by the officer, the police chief, and the chairman of the Board of Fire Commissioners. But Mr Mac Kenzie said that in not allowing Patrolman Henry Stormer to see the log on March 9, he was backing up Chief Dispatcher Betty Forbes’ policy of only allowing the fire marshal to see the log. Officer Stormer explained he was investigating fires in conjunction with Deputy Fire Marshal William Halstead. Officer Stormer said he was “shocked” by Mr Mac Kenzie’s reaction to his request. In the past, he never had a problem in seeing the log.

 

March 20, 1964

Newtown’s robins must have decided to celebrate their arrival with a convention on Mt Pleasant. Mrs Henry Taylor looked out her window about 4 pm on Sunday, March 8, to find more than 30 of them busily hunting their dinner on her lawn. The following morning, one robin breakfasted in the Bethel garden of a Bee staff member, and a half dozen visited Mrs Fred H. Bennett on Poverty Hollow Road early this week. In deference to the enthusiasm of the last two robin viewers, it should be noted that Mrs Taylor has seen only one or two at a time since the March 8 lawn party.

 

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Four hundred and sixty four students out of an eligible 502 went to the polls at Newtown High School on Wednesday and elected Herb Rosenthal, Gold Party candidate, First Selectman for Town Government Day. Two weeks ago when the Gold Town Committee submitted its slate, Herbert Rosenthal, current senior class president, was not the choice for first selectman. In caucus he challenged the selected candidate for the top spot and came out victorious.

 

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Lorenzo’s Grill, located on Lake Zoar, will open this Friday, March 20, for the season. Louis Lorenzo, who has just returned from Florida after spending the winter there, will again serve delicious Italian spaghetti, grinders, and apizza, with orders to go.

 

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Overcrowding and a disturbance at the Hillandale Club for teenagers on Route 6 last Saturday night has resulted in its closing, pending an inspection by the local fire marshal, Millard Goosel. The fracas occurred after a large group of youngsters from out of town arrived during the course of the evening. There were just too many, both inside and outside the club, and some in the large crowd, estimated at over 200, got out of hand.

 

March 17, 1939

Selectman Stanley J. Blackman and his crew of men did fine work in opening the many miles of town roads after the heavy storm Sunday and Monday. Much credit is due these men, who work all hours of the day and night plowing out the roads for local residents.

 

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Dear Mr Smith: In answer to Mr George Jackson’s request for information on Indian camps, sites, etc in Newtown. The word “Poodatuck” itself is a whole story of a camp and location. It is a “Mohigan” word meaning “The country about the Falls.” This camp was on the west side of the Poodatuck River, on the hill above the Falls, between Sandy hook and Housatonic River. The dead were buried on the far of Robert Mitchell in Southbury. In 1600 there were 250 inhabitants of this camp. On the east shore of Lake Taunton there was another camp of the Poodatuck Indians. Lester A. Wood, Woodbury, Conn.

 

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The Annual Fairfield County Poultry Party, sponsored by the Fairfield County Farm Bureau, will take place next Tuesday evening, March 21, at the Edmond Town Hall gymnasium. The annual Egg Show, beginning at 7:30, as usual will be the feature of the party. In this event ribbon prizes will be awarded the three highest scoring dozen of eggs in both the white and brown classes. A silver trophy properly inscribed, will be awarded the winner of the sweepstakes. The largest, smallest, and queerest shaped eggs will also receive awards. Moving pictures depicting brooding and range management will be shown.

 

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“Charlie” Carlson was out during the storm Sunday and Monday, clearing the sidewalks and many of the side roads with his snow plow, hooked on behind his trusty Model A. Charlie deserves a great deal of credit for his public spirited effort.

 

March 20, 1914

In one for the fastest and best played basketball games ever seen in the Newtown town hall, the Mercury’s of Danbury, lost to the home team last Thursday night by a score of 27 to 18. The low score was due t the wonderful defensive work of both fives, the plays being broke up before they really got started. The members of the Mercury team are loud in their praise of the treatment they received in Newtown, and the contest was remarkably clean, only six fouls being called and five of these were turned into goals by the four point throwers.

 

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Selectman T.F. Brew is doing an extensive job of carpentering at the Taunton farm house for Rev Lee W. Beattie. They are to erect a new barn, among other improvements.

 

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Mrs Susan L. Hall, the oldest resident of the town, celebrated her 93d birthday on Thursday with a dinner party at her home in Sandy Hook. Mrs Hall still retains all her faculties and does her own housework. She is the widow of William L. Hall, Sandy Hook’s first postmaster. Mrs Hall, the heroine of the occasion, never appeared younger or in better spirits.

 

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A.D. Fairchild has sold his milk for the ensuing year to Tuttle Brothers, who have a creamery at Hawleyville. Robert D. Smith will ship the milk from his dairy, the coming year, to the Mitchell Dairy Co. at Bridgeport.

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