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The Way We Were

April 29, 1988

First Selectman Rod Mac Kenzie will look into the possibility of establishing an impoundment area for abandoned vehicles. Abandoned vehicles are towed to local garages where they are kept for a period of time without compensation to the garage. Storing these vehicles sometimes created eyesores and zoning problems, according to the first selectman.

 

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Some called it timely maintenance, some called it overrun and some called it an extension of the project, but the bottom line is that if everything that should be done is done, the $6 million Middle School renovation project will cost another $500,000. At a joint special meeting of the Legislative Council and the Board of Education on Wednesday night, Walt Ruhlman, chairman of the Public Building Committee, presented an update of the Middle School project. “You run into certain problems as you do with any job. Renovations are especially difficult,” he said.

 

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For many pieces of junk, the final day you can dump them free at the town landfill is Saturday, April 30 — a day when the landfill is expected to be crowded with people seeking to unload things that it will cost them to unload later. The landfill’s fee system takes effect Monday, May 2. After that, there will be only one type of free dumping. That will be for residents dumping household trash.

 

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It took just an hour and a half for 183 people to approve the $30.25 million operating budget for the 1988-89 fiscal year. The budget was passed in a voice vote at a town meeting at the high school auditorium on April 26.

 

May 3, 1963

Mrs Hans W. Kretsch, chairman, and Joseph T. Chase, chairman for business and industry, met recently to discuss plans for the Mental Health Campaign which will take place during the month of May. In appealing for support to fight mental illness, which is now recognized as our number one health problem, Mrs Kretsch cited the increasing hopeful outlook. “New drugs, improved treatment methods and more favorable hospital conditions have increased the proportion of mental patients making recoveries. And on another front, that of prevention, expanded community mental health services geared to spot and treat troubles early can also play an important part.”

 

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On Saturday, May 4, all of Newtown will honor Tad Kawai, our AFS student from Japan, as gaily-colored paper carp fly from many homes. Mrs David Hoeffner, art teacher for the elementary schools, has given the AFS planning committee her utmost cooperation. Not only will her art classes, the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades at Sandy Hook and Hawley Schools and the sixth graders at the high school participate, but she has given the information and instructions to the teachers of the first through third grades at Sandy Hook and Hawley Schools.

 

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The May meeting of the Horticulture Club will be held next Thursday evening on the subject “Help! Rescue Our Wildflowers!” The speaker will be “Hatsy” Taylor (Mrs Henry H. Taylor) of Fairfield. Mrs Taylor, who is both an accomplished musician and wild flower enthusiast, combines these two talents into an entertaining and informative “singing lecture” on wild flowers in general and conservation of native plants in particular. She writes all of the music and most of the words for her songs.

 

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The Land’s End Country Store in Hawleyville will open for the season on Monday, May 6. This well-known shop specializing in antiques and gift items is operated by Mrs Robert J. Clark for the benefit of the Bobby Clark Memorial Research Fund at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Mrs Clark is hoping for another successful season and will be pleased to welcome old and new friends at her shop.

 

April 29, 1938

District and Deputy Fire Wardens were instructed on Wednesday to issue no more permits for kindling fires in the open, exception the day of a rain, and that all permits already issued are cancelled until further notice. Permits will be issued again as soon as conditions are safe.

 

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Approximately 6,500,000 automobiles, valued at $50 or less, are owned and operated by people with incomes of less than $20 a week according to figures gathered by the American Petroleum Institute.

 

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Dr W.F. Desmond, health officer, reports five cases of scarlet fever in town. He does not consider the situation alarming or in any way indicating an epidemic as only one of the cases is among the school children. The victims include Orville Botsford, son of Mr and Mrs Charles Botsford, Mrs Earle Meyers, Arthur Hyatt, Virginia Laborde, and the small son of Mr and Mrs John McMahon.

 

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Announcement is made that silk stockings, in all the latest shades, including white, black, and gray are now on sale at Hawley Manor for the benefit of the Visiting Nurse Association. These stockings are priced at three pairs for $2. For further information call Newtown 12; 358-2; 14-2; 203-3; 278;480.

 

May 2, 1913

Through the courtesy and generosity of C.B. Taylor, the use of land for the High School Gardens for this year has been given, and the agricultural class are at work on them. Through the energy of Principal Johnson, the grounds about the High School building have been laid out in flower beds and graded, which will add greatly to the looks of the property.

 

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A very commendable piece of road work is being done about the old Griffin button shop in Huntingtown district, under the supervision of Selectman W.C. Johnson. When completed we hope to be able to go over the road minus the mud.

 

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Charles F. Beardsley has begun selling his asparagus crop, it all being taken by one party in New Haven. It is neatly bunched, the labels bearing the inscription “Sunny View Cottage Farm.” One package shown the scribe contained 15 stalks and weighed three pounds.

 

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E.J. Thrall, Sr, has finished at Snake Rock farm, an up-to-date swimming pool, 50 feet long and five and one-half feet deep. It has cement bottoms and sides.

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