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  • Church Members Explain Reasons For Planned Land Sale To Hook & Ladder

    Representatives of Trinity Episcopal Church, which plans to sell land to the Newtown Hook & Ladder volunteer firefighting organization for construction of a new firehouse, have explained church members’ thinking in terms of their recent decision to sell the land. Several months ago, the fire company approached the church about a land purchase for firehouse construction. The church owns eight acres at 36 Main Street, of which the fire company would buy three acres which have vehicle access from the south side of Church Hill Road. In a statement issued last week, Rick Haylon and Bart Geissinger, the wardens for Trinity Episcopal Church, explained church members’ views in deciding to sell land to the fire company for a new firehouse.

  • Brookfield Dispatcher Keeps Job After Newtown Comments

    (AP) A public safety dispatcher in Brookfield is being allowed to keep his job despite an outcry over a comment he posted on Facebook about the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings. Gregory Beck is a dispatcher in Brookfield and lives in town. Referring to a tribute called “26 Days of Kindness” in honor of the 20 children and six adults killed on 12/14, Beck wrote on Facebook in November that his kindness would be distributing ammunition to his friends. He later apologized. Brookfield’s Board of Ethics decided Thursday, January 9, to take no disciplinary action against Beck, who posted the comment from his personal cellphone while on the dispatcher job. The board could have recommended discipline ranging from reprimand to termination.

  • Finance Board Weighs Senior Tax Relief Options

    Noting that a number of residents are “looking for a gesture from the town,” regarding additional tax relief, Board of Finance Chairman John Kortze stressed that he wanted his board members to have a dialogue during a January 7 special meeting. Could they make a recommendation to the Legislative Council to enact non-income-based relief programs, age-based programs, or other initiatives? Board members and First Selectman Pat Llodra considered several ways to bring added relief to senior taxpayers in Newtown. No formal motions resulted from the discussion, however.

  • $70,000 In 12/14 Charity Donations Missing, State AG, IRS Getting Involved

    Senator Chris Murphy is calling for the Internal Revenue Service to open an investigation into a Nashville, Tenn. charity formed in the wake of 12/14 that has been unable to account for more than $70,000 it raised through marathon running. On January 10, 26.4.26 Foundation co-founder Ryan Graney said only $30,000 of the $103,000 taken in has been used for the organization’s purpose. That money was presented last January by co-founder Robbie Bruce to the nonprofit NYA, a youth sports center in Newtown. Graney said Bruce was in charge of the organization’s finances but Bruce has cut off contact with her. On Tuesday, January 14, Senator Murphy sent a letter to John Koskinen, Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to call for an immediate investigation into the foundation. Graney said she noticed something was amiss last spring, when she discovered suspicious charges to the foundation’s PayPal account. Graney says she filed reports about the missing money with the FBI and local officials after Bruce was unable to explain where it went.

  • Father of Newtown Gunman Willing To Help Sandy Hook Commission Obtain Health Records

    HARTFORD (AP) — The father of the 20-year-old gunman who committed the Newtown school shooting said Friday he is willing to help provide his late son's medical records to the state commission reviewing the massacre and attempting to make recommendation on changes to mental health policy. The Associated Press reported January 10 that Errol Cockfield, a spokesman for Peter Lanza, issued a statement saying the perpatrator's father had already informed law enforcement that he would "approve the release of any medical records he has the authority to release" and that he has informed the chairman of the Sandy Hook Advisory Commission that "he is willing to meet with him towards reaching that goal." The commission was created by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy to review the Dec. 14, 2012, shooting. Some mental health experts who sit on the commission have said they want to see Adam Lanza's records, including any behavioral assessments conducted at schools Lanza attended, to determine if there were any gaps in treatment and to gain insight into the shooter and the state of his mental health. They've expressed disappointment in the lack of original documents released by the prosecutor and state police from their investigation.

  • Latest Offer On SHS Parcel Rejected; Access Options Weighed

    The Legislative Council was informed January 8 that the town’s last, best offer on two Riverside Road parcels officials hoped would provide an optimal and alternative entryway for the new Sandy Hook School was rejected by the property owners through their attorney. First Selectman Pat Llodra reported to the council that a $650,000 offer presented with a caveat was turned down by the Oberstadt family who resides at and owns the 12 Riverside Road property adjacent to the Sandy Hook School. Mrs Llodra said she informed the Oberstadts that she could not ensure that $650,000 would receive final approval by elected officials who also have roles in authorizing town spending.

  • Resident Guarantees $200,000 To Complete Main Street Sidewalk Connection

    Newtown resident Joseph Draper announced to a group of Newtown officials January 7 his plan to guarantee at least $200,000 to fortify a nominal memorial fund and serve as a challenge to others to donate toward completing a sidewalk loop that will eventually link all but one of Newtown’s schools. Mr Draper, a principal with Ice Energy and Pacific Advantage Capital, met with First Selectman Pat Llodra, Health District Director Donna Culbert, Land Use officials George Benson and Jean St Jean, as well as Newtown Borough Burgess Jay Maher in the council chambers for an extended discussion about the grant.

  • Clothing No Longer Needed, Ladies Auxiliary Still Collecting For Shelton Fire Victims

    The Ladies Auxiliary of Sandy Hook Volunteer Fire & Rescue Co., has for years been called upon to offer aid to the members of their host company during emergencies. This week the women have stepped forward to help others affected by a fire. The women are collecting items for the families who were displaced following a major fire in Shelton during the overnight of January 5-6. They are hoping that by offering a central donation point, Newtown residents will be able to offer aid to others as well. While clothing is no longer needed, according to Shelton firefighters coordinating a recovery effort, everything else to rebuild a home it. At least one member of the Sandy Hook ladies auxiliary will make a second trip to Echo Hose Hook & Ladder company's station on January 15, with supplies from the residents of Newtown.

  • Two Hour Delay For Newtown Public Schools Friday

    The Newtown Public Schools will have a two hour delay and there will be no morning pre-kindergarten on Friday, January 10, due to the weather.

  • Change Of Venue For Library Board Meeting

    C.H. Booth Library Board of Trustees meets January 14, in Community Room of Newtown Savings Bank, at 7 pm.