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  • P&Z Rejects Rule Change For Scrap Tire Recycling

    Following lengthy review, Planning and Zoning Commission members on February 5 unanimously rejected a proposed change to the zoning regulations, which would have allowed privately-owned solid waste facilities for the storage and recycling of scrap tires at properties with M-1 (Industrial) zoning.

  • Prescription Drug Drop Box In Use Again At Police Station

    Residents again have access to a local receptacle designed for the proper disposal of unused, expired, and unwanted prescription drugs at the police station lobby at 3 Main Street. A large gray steel container, which looks like a US mail drop box, had been in place in the police station lobby for years, but was taken out of service recently so that some security improvements could be made.

  • NHS ‘Lock-In Open’ Status Prompted By ‘Suspicious Note’

    A “lock-in open” status at Newtown High School has been lifted, according to emails sent to district parents, following an investigation this morning, Monday, February 23. According to an email sent by Superintendent of Schools Joseph V. Erardi, Jr, to parents following the event around 9:50 am, “At approximately 8:15 am this morning, administrators at [NHS] were made aware of a suspicious note that prompted a lock-in open setting. A lock-in open maintains the teaching and learning environment, allows students, and staff to leave the school, and limits visitors entering the building. Staff and students immediately notified that the lock-in was not a drill, but that normal business within the school would continue.”

  • Youth Charged With Two Felonies In NHS Incident

    Police said midday on Monday, February 23, that they arrested a boy under age 18 on charges of first-degree threatening and first-degree falsely reporting an incident. Police allege he wrote a suspicious note discovered at Newtown High School, which resulted in the school temporarily entering a “lock-in open” security mode. Police Lieutenant Richard Robinson said both charges are Class D felonies. It was initially unclear whether the boy is a student at the school. Also, it was unclear whether other arrests would be made in the case. Police did not disclose the boy’s identity because he is under age 18.

  • Swift Remediation Aims For A Swift Reopening Of Children’s Department At CHB

    Although the C.H. Booth Library Children’s Department remained closed to the public, as of Monday, February 23, Library Director Brenda McKinley had a positive outlook on the imminent reopening of that area, badly affected by water damage last Tuesday, February 17, when frozen sprinkler system pipes burst. “I would say it’s weeks,” said Ms McKinley, as opposed to the months it took to reopen the library after the January 2014 flood. “J.P. Maguire [remediation company] is moving so quickly.” New carpet and ceiling tiles are already ordered, she said, and workers from J.P. Maguire were busy disassembling shelving in the Children’s Department, moving furniture out of the way, and packing books not water damaged into boxes.

  • Finance Board Hears Refined Details On School Closing Options

    After a preliminary, exploratory report trying to quantify costs and potential savings if the Board of Education decided to close a local school, Board of Finance member John Godin reviewed the issue recently, updating information with the district’s own data and some school closing assumptions developed under former Superintendent of Schools Janet Robinson.

  • 20th Citizen Police Academy To Be Offered To The Public

    The Newtown Police Department will offer its 20th Citizen Police Academy program on law enforcement and the criminal justice system for the general public. The free program, which will start on April 1, is open to people who are at least age 18. Patrol Sergeant Matthew Wood will serve as coordinator for the academy sessions, which will be held weekly. The program provides participating residents and business owners with an overview of local law enforcement. Through classroom sessions and through hands-on instruction, participants will be shown how local law enforcement operates.

  • Burglaries Doubled, Thefts Dropped In 2014

    Statistics on the incidence of property crime that occurred during 2014 compiled by town police indicate that the number of reported burglaries in 2014 more than doubled compared to 2013, and the number of reported thefts decreased. According to those statistics, police received reports of 52 burglaries during 2014, compared to 24 burglaries in 2013, representing an almost 117 percent increase in that crime category. The town police department statistics do not include the various criminal and motor vehicle violations issued by the state police in Newtown. State police enforcement occurs in areas including Interstate 84, state-owned sections of Fairfield Hills, and Garner Correctional Institution.

  • Bullying: A Problem Behavior That Spans Generations

    In a population of more than 320,000,000 people, US Census statistics show that 40.3 million are people 65 years of age and older. Of those, according to the National Center for Assisted Living, more than 735,000 men and women live in assisted living situations. Approximately 1.3 million more are housed in nursing homes.Within the walls of residences, homes, and anywhere large numbers of senior citizens gather, a pecking order plays out. At its best, it allows leaders to lead. At its worst, it is bullying, no different than that seen in adolescent circles. Unless witnesses speak up or managers intervene, bullying is a behavior that can compound the sometimes already fragile mental and physical health of others. People live longer, and the number of senior citizens living in congregate housing has increased greatly since the 1980s, said Donna Fedus, MA, gerontologist, founder of eldercare resource Borrow My Glasses, and director of elder programs at The Consultation Center, Yale University School of Medicine.

  • P&Z Approves Apartments For Veterinary Students

    Following review, Planning and Zoning Commission members have approved a request from Fairfield Equine Associates to expand the terms of its existing special permit to allow the firm to create two more apartments for veterinary students at its 32 Barnabas Road facility in Hawleyville. Nancy Stevens, representing Fairfield Equine, presented the apartment proposal to P&Z members at a brief February 5 public hearing. Under the plan, Fairfield Equine would create two apartments in existing attic space for veterinary students, known as “externs,” who work at the hospital for short periods.