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The Way We Were

February 24, 1989

Two men, one of them a Sandy Hook resident, have been arrested in connection with a January 2 incident in which they allegedly harassed the American bald eagles that are wintering near the Shepaug Dam on the Housatonic River. Department of Environmental Protection Conservation Officer Thomas Bull made the arrests after an investigation into the incident in which the two men allegedly drove the boat they were in to a restricted area directly under the trees where the eagles were nesting, in order to take pictures.

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For the second consecutive year, five area towns — including Newtown — are being asked to start a regional paramedic program. When the proposal was raised last year, it died after several area towns rejected it  and the other towns then considered it too expensive. It is doubtful as to whether the proposal will be accepted this year. It would provide a staff of paramedics who, when called by a participant, would rush to the scene of an ambulance call. The paramedic then would work with the ambulance personnel from that town and board that town’s ambulance for the trip to the hospital.

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“It ain’t the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” These words never held more true than last Tuesday night when the fourth seeded Newtown Lady Indians pulled off the girls high school basketball upset of the year in defeating Connecticut’s number one team, the Masuk Panthers, in the first round of the Western Connecticut Conference playoffs, 35-32. During the regular season, Masuk defeated Newtown by scores of 61-32 and 56-36.

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Vandals drove a car across the wet grounds at Middle Gate School’s old schoolhouse sometime last week, causing deep ruts that will cost $400 to repair, according to parks superintendent Ron Moffat. Mr Moffat said he is frustrated by the amount of time he and his crews devote to repairing damage caused by vandals. This winter, for example, parks workers repaired a torn ice rink liner at Dickinson Park nearly half a dozen times before skaters stopped ripping it.

 

February 28, 1964

The Newtown Rotary Club will have its 25th anniversary at its dinner meeting on Monday evening, March 2, at the Yankee Drover Inn. All former members will be welcome and are urged to attend, joining present members in recalling events of the club’s first quarter century, talking over old times, renewing old acquaintances and making new friends.

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The Newtown Board of Education has acted on the recommendation of Superintendent of Schools James F. Hinckley that the position of Director of Guidance be established. This position will be placed on an eleven-month basis to enable the Director of Guidance to complete programming of children who move to the district during the summer, make program changes for students who have failed courses, aid the principal in scheduling classes, handle last minute requests by college admissions offices, and evaluate the overall of the high school guidance program.

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The United States Civil Service Commission announces an examination for substitute clerk at the Sandy Hook Post Office. The rate of pay is $2.33 an hour for substitutes. Increases are given according to length of service.

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The spring hat and purse bar for women patients of the Fairfield Hills Hospital will be held on Tuesday, March 24, from 9 am to 2:30 pm in the gymnasium of Plymouth Hall on the hospital grounds. Between 800 and 900 women patients will have the opportunity of choosing a hat and accessories in time for Easter Sunday. The success of the event, according to Mrs William Wilson, volunteer services leader, will depend on the generous response to the appeal for hats and handbags now being made.

 

February 24, 1939

Of interest to local residents will be the broadcast over Radio Station WABC, on this Friday noon, when Mary Margaret McBride will give a sketch on “Big Bill Egan, the World’s Friendliest Man.” Mr Egan, Stationmaster at the Pennsylvania Railroad Station, New York City, is a native of Newtown, where he has a host of friends, spending his week-ends at Camp Egan on Walnut Tree Hill.

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A gay, happy throng attended the annual Young People’s Winter Formal, held last Friday evening in the Alexandria room of the Edmond Town Hall. The music of Roy Wright’s Noblers, a smooth 10-piece swing band from New Britain, was enjoyed by the crowd and their variety of orchestrations proved quite popular with everyone. A feature of the evening was the lucky number dance, in which everyone participated. Miss Betty Kalmbacher and Hervey Ward were the winners, receiving a suitable prize. The balloon dance, as usual, was very popular. Refreshments of ice cream and cookies were served midway in the program.

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Extensive alterations have been started on the Sandy Hook diner. A large kitchen is being built on the south side and a new entrance will be made to the dining room and lunch counter. The interior of the dining room is to be entirely renovated and new booths will be erected to take the place of the dining tables. Contractor Martin Selander is doing the work.

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For those persons who maintain we do not have the “old-fashioned winters” our forefathers tell us of, there comes a convincing argument in an assertion by the US Weather Bureau. According to the Taylor Instrument Company of Rockefeller Center, New York City, the Bureau reports that for the last 50 years, there has been a definite “warming up” of the climate. This change is easily detected statistically, although it might not be noticeable otherwise. By no means, however, does this mean each year is a little warmer than the preceding one. On the contrary, some of the coldest years on record have fallen within this period.

 

February 27, 1914

Electric lighting facilities for the residences and places of business in Newtown will probably be an actuality by May 1. Work of installing the poles and wires from the power house of the trolley company on Leemac avenue has already been commenced. The route is to be along Cross street to the road to the Beaver Brook paper mill, and then along the road through Stony Hill district to Newtown. A number of pole transformers will be installed in the town of Newtown to transform the voltage for the electric lighting in the houses. About 30 miles of wire will be used in transmitting the electric light current.

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“The winter of our daddies” is still with us. The thermometer registered at two degrees below zero at Charles Gilbert’s in Sandy Hook, Tuesday morning, and four degrees below at the residence of Postmaster W.M. Reynolds. Sunday morning the record of the thermometer was from zero to eight below in town. Wednesday morning, the cold wave continued unbroken. Gas machines furnishing illumination to residences and places of business got balky and many farmers have been inconvenienced in getting water for stock.

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A horse belonging to Ely Greenblat, driven by a friend to the basket ball game at the Town hall, Washington birthday night, got away from its driver while standing in front of the hall. The horse ran down Church hill, toward Sandy Hook, demolishing the sleigh. The horse was found the following day at Paul Pierce’s place in Hanover.

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The new gasoline street light near the residence of Mrs M.S. Otis, was in operation for the first time, Monday night. It is finely located, throwing its illumination down Queen Street and up and down Church Hill avenue.

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