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mental health

  • The Opportunity To Heal

    Newtown’s congressional representatives announced ten days ago that the town had secured another federal grant — this one $7.1 million from the Department of Justice — for mental health services and school safety measures. It is the latest infusion of money from the government in the wake of the December 2012 tragedy at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. It follows earlier grants from the Office for Victims of Crime and the US Department of Education’s School Emergency Response to Violence program totaling $4.7 million.

  • Post-12/14 Panel Recommends Mental Health Changes For CT’s Young Adults

    The task force established after the Newtown shootings to examine mental health issues among young adults released 47 recommendations Tuesday in what a key legislative leader described as a “blueprint” for future legislative action on behavioral health.

  • New Survey Highlights Concerns For Long-Term Post 12/14 Support

    While many residents surveyed by volunteers of the Newtown-Sandy Hook Community Foundation continue to express a high degrees of anxiety, fear, and stress, it has also become evident that efforts to raise funds to assist these individuals with ongoing counseling are challenged to maintain the level of fundraising required to cover the related costs.

  • Concerned About Mental Health Screening In Schools

    To the Editor:

    The Signs of Suicide depression screening test that is about to be implemented in the Newtown High School causes me serious concern, and it should alarm other parents as well.

  • The Sandy Hook Effect In Hartford

    When the next legislative session begins in Hartford on Wednesday next week, Governor Dannel P. Malloy will outline his priorities in his formal budget message. The extent to which Newtown and the 12/14 tragedy in Sandy Hook has aligned priorities for the governor and legislators will be obvious.

  • Private Psychology, Public Policy

    When Governor Dannel P. Malloy appointed the Sandy Hook Advisory Commission a year ago, he charged the panel with “taking a broad systemic approach in crafting the recommendations that will lead to comprehensive legislative and policy changes that must occur following the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School.” He explained that this included “ensuring that our mental health system can reach those that need its help.” Like everyone else who has tried to answer the ultimate 12/14 question — why?

  • When Connecticut’s Budget Realities Follow Tragedies

    State legislators sprang into action after the Newtown tragedy, allocating nearly $19 million for an array of initiatives on school safety, mental health and gun control.

    For the third time in six years lawmakers spoke decisively – and in bipartisan fashion – about crucial reforms made in response to tragedy.

    But with a sluggish recovery and a significant budget deficit looming after the 2014 elections, will those Newtown initiatives survive?

  • ‘Toolkit’ For Mental Health, Substance Abuse Care Released

    State insurance officials have released a “toolkit” they hope will make it easier for Connecticut residents to get coverage for mental health and substance abuse treatment.

    The nine-page document provides guidance on what questions to ask health care providers and insurers to help ensure that care will be covered, and it includes a checklist of information to gather for those who want to appeal denied claims. Officials developed the guide with experts from the UConn Health Center and insurance companies.

  • Keeping Mental Health Needs In View

    There are some things about Newtown’s profound loss on 12/14 that the community would prefer to keep from prying eyes. As demolition experts worked to dismantle the old Sandy Hook School over the past week, the town tried to thwart those who wanted to witness the community’s private pain as this wounded place was stripped bare.

  • Meeting The Challenge Of Gun Violence

    To the Editor: