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Police Commission

  • In 12/14 PTSD Case, Police Chief Withdraws Job Termination Recommendation

    Police Chief Michael Kehoe has reversed an earlier position and decided against pursuing job termination against Police Officer Thomas Bean, a town police officer who responded to the 12/14 mass shooting incident at Sandy Hook School and subsequently has been off work since then due to a medical diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  • Union Pushes For Talks On Disabled Cop’s Departure

    A town police officer diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), who has not worked since the December 14 shootings at Sandy Hook School, has been informed by the town that he could be fired as a police officer.

    Town officials have nothing to say on the topic, declining comment and terming the issue a personnel matter.

  • Enforcing Handicapped Parking Compliance

    To the Editor:

  • Residents Raise Concerns About Hazardous Traffic

    In their role as the town/borough traffic authority, Police Commission members hear from many residents about traffic safety problems on local roads.

    At a September 3 session, commission members heard about problems on several town center roads, as well as problems on the outlying Brushy Hill Road.

    Resident Richard English of 3 Curry Drive told commission members about problems in that area. Curry Drive is a dead-end street that extends from Currituck Road.

  • Police Commission Complimented For Queen Street Safety Effort

    Robert Geckle of 35 Queen Street attended the September 3 Police Commission meeting to thank the agency for addressing traffic speed concerns on the road which links Church Hill Road to Mile Hill Road. Since late last year, the town has installed five permanent speed tables on the southern section of Queen Street to hold down traffic speeds. 

  • The Police Commission’s Obsession With Queen Street

    To the Editor:

  • Queen St. Residents Applaud Speed Tables For Traffic Control

    A small group of Queen Street residents attended a Police Commission session this week to thank that agency, which serves as the local traffic authority, for having had five permanent speed tables installed on the southern section of the mile-long street that links Church Hill Road to Mile Hill Road.

    The town recently installed two new speed tables on Queen Street, bringing to five the number of such speed-calming devices on the north-south road. The town installed the initial three speed tables late last year.

  • Moving Traffic Strategy Beyond Queen Street

    Town crews were out early this week painting the speed bumps on Queen Street school-bus yellow, to raise the visibility of the raised pavement at five spots along the length of the popular thru-road between the town’s commercial center and Wasserman Way. The street is distinctly less popular these days. The “traffic calming devices” in the road are not having a calming effect on the frustration levels of drivers, who must alternately accelerate and brake along the short unimpeded interstices as they prepare to clear one bump after another.

  • Improving Traffic Safety

    To the Editor:

    Over the past few weeks I have read with interest several letters concerning the speed tables on Queen Street. About nine years ago, shortly after buying properties on Queen Street, I attended my first meeting to discuss traffic issues on Queen Street. I left that meeting thinking that action would be taken.

  • Queen Street Has Important Friends

    To the Editor:

    The Police Commission, who approved five speed bumps on Queen Street, and Pat Llodra, who authorized their installation, have done a huge disservice to Newtown.  It has negatively changed the character of the Borough and Newtown forever. The number of bumps is a clear indication that the primary objective was to divert auto, truck and bus traffic off Queen Street, not speed.