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  • Resident’s Personal Journey Through Art To Benefit SHOP

    Dashed onto a canvas in oils is an image of Sabrina Style’s front window, dresses displayed in the pane glass of the Washington Avenue dress shop and boutique. Again with dabs of vibrant oil colors, Main Street and other Newtown and Sandy Hook scenes have come to life thanks to artist and Newtown resident Jim Chillington. Four of the painter’s pieces will be sold or auctioned off during a June 15 Sandy Hook Organization for Prosperity (SHOP) fundraiser and wine tasting event to benefit local businesses. The second annual SHOP fundraiser will benefit Newtown Scholarship Association and FAITH Food Pantry, as well as provide SHOP with future event funding.

  • New Christmas Tree Is Ready For The Holidays In Sandy Hook Center

    Sandy Hook Center has a new Christmas tree.Crews began working before 8 am on a rainy and chilly Friday, putting final touches on the ground and then readying a 32-foot Norway Spruce to be moved out of a truck-mounted tree spade, and then into a hole that had been readied for it. By 11 am May 24, the tree was in the ground, with workers putting the final shovels of dirt around its base...

  • Big Brothers Big Sisters Grows With Donations From Newtown

    The Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) Donation Center at 127 South Main Street opened in March, and donation center attendant Mike Thomas said that he is “real happy” with the response the collection center has generated in Newtown. From a first week count of 27 donors, that number has rapidly grown. In the final week in April, Mr Thomas said, 119 people had stopped by to donate everything from clothing and shoes to children’s bicycles, furniture, games, and more. “We are seeing a lot of repeat customers, and that’s a good thing,” Mr Thomas said. Big Brothers Big Sisters is an organization matching children between the ages of 6 and 15 with a volunteer mentor at least 18 years of age or older. The “Bigs” as they are known, are asked to commit to meeting once a week, twice a month, or once a month with their “Littles” for three to five hours at a time, for a year. The one-on-one mentoring program provides at-risk children with positive role models, and is supported by professionals that offer guidance.

  • Brown Bird Musicians Need Help From Fans

    Acoustic indie folk band Brown Bird, featuring the duo of Dave Lamb and hometown musician MorganEve Swain, are hoping friends, family, and fans can assist them with unexpected medical expenses that have sidelined the performers for much of May, and possibly longer. 

  • The Way We Were

    A look back at Newtown, 25, 50, 75, and 100 years ago.

  • Snapshot: Debbie Sullivan

    A weekly profile of a local resident.

  • The Top of the Mountain

    Newtown, from a cat's point of view.

  • Great Pootatuck Duck Race Chair: The Race Will Go On, Rain Or Shine

    It’s a good thing ducks like water. The Great Pootatuck Duck Race may set a record tomorrow. If the rain continues the way it is being predicted, the Pootatuck River in Sandy Hook Center will be moving pretty quickly on Saturday, May 25. Granted, it will be thousands of rubber ducks going for a swim at 2:30 tomorrow afternoon, but they may make the swim from the Church Hill Road bridge to the Dayton Street bridge in record time. Duck Race Chairman Bob Schmidt says the ducks are going for that race, rain or shine.

  • One Good Turn Deserves Another

    Newtown resident Kim Calbo remembers how nice it was, after 12/14, to walk into a local restaurant or coffee shop and discover that a complete stranger — sometimes from across the country — was picking up the tab that day for anyone who ordered food or drinks.

  • Newtown Residents Find Their Hobby Is More Than Rocket Science — It’s A Blast!

    The usually placid Gill Corn Farm in Hurley, N.Y., an expansive cornfield in the southern foothills of the Catskill Mountains, was alive with the sights and sounds of rocket engines during Connecticut Rocket Association’s (CTRA) bimonthly rocket launch on Saturday, May 4. Powerful rockets, some exceeding eight feet in length, ripped off the launching pads with a roar and reached heights of up to 6,000 feet before floating safely back down to earth with the aid of parachutes. Approximately 30 spectators, many of them members of CTRA, and among them a few residents of Newtown, watched scores of adrenaline-producing launches from a dirt road that cut through the field.